You are not logged in.

#26 2012-03-03 21:30:39

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 9077

Re: The outer limits of shirting

Oo Bop Sh'bam wrote:

Here is an example of how I think you can clash colours and patterns and still have them work... I think this way works better for men's dress as I think that the tonal approach even when done well, makes a man look too feminine. I ted to now pick colours that are discordant. Like tetrads, or very wide analogs. So below you have the greeny/blue sat along side a green, and both their complementary colours are there, the yellow, and the red. This means the outfit isn't just as obvious as a two colour complementary palette, but has this next layer of depth by using a close tetrad combination.


http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m07x7 … o1_400.jpg

http://30.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m0c9t … o1_400.png

Where as here I went for a tonal approach, and I just think it looks twee and camp as fuck, I'm definitely moving to the more contrasting colours, than the analog palettes. Also, quick tip if you are dressed in blue, and red, liven it up with an indigo, and a yellow to contrast. The indigo will lift the whole thing. Here I did it with the loafers.

http://30.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m03tj … o1_400.jpg

I reckon the problem is, for a man to look good he shouldn't look like he has tried to match colours, which is what these analog palettes do, they look too feminine.

http://28.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m0c9u … o1_400.png

If you mix like colors or tones, you can do more bizarre things. For instance a bright red on a sugary pink (vs on a greyish pink) or a lemony yellow tie on a bright red butcher striped shirt (rather than a gold tie).

Im not going to lie to you here. If you were in the same room with me wearing that sweater, I'd probably bite your arm.

I would wear a fire engine red sweater vest with that. However, I do understand what you're saying.


Le costume fait sur mesure en tissue Fresco est le préféré des ploucs!
Facebook: FNB Dandy  Twitter: @DevilsIslandFNB Instagram: fnbdandy

 

#27 2012-03-03 21:40:35

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 9077

Re: The outer limits of shirting

g- wrote:

Ali Kebab wrote:

formby wrote:


Acorn sell directly to the public.

I know. It's the top one in buffy's photo I need to get. I've been looking for this particular gingham for quite a while.

No doubt there are some nice clothes there.  Would love to see more to get ideas.

I am pretty much a walking advertisement for Acorn. Which you never see in NYC. In some odd manner, I feel like they designed the entire series of ranges just for me. I am currently adding quite a bit of Ringhart. They do that City boy look very well. Again, not something you see that much in NYC. It's the dandiacal equivalent of jet fuel.


Le costume fait sur mesure en tissue Fresco est le préféré des ploucs!
Facebook: FNB Dandy  Twitter: @DevilsIslandFNB Instagram: fnbdandy

 

#28 2012-03-04 00:19:49

fxh
Big Down Under.
From: Melbourne
Posts: 6155

Re: The outer limits of shirting

ooey - careful with the jazz / colours/ tonal/ music / coltrane/ Miles  thingo - it will freak out the dudes over here on the Wardrobe* , who aren't used to your IVY musings.

* their musical tastes run to Backman Turner Overdrive Greatest Hits.


To do: insert constantly changing witty, knowing and slightly ironic literary quote or reference.

http://sexyankles.tumblr.com/

 

#29 2012-03-04 00:30:12

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14333

Re: The outer limits of shirting

g- wrote:

This is my wildest shirt.
http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u145 … wotone.jpg

I don't wear it at often as I would like to beause many people do not appreciate two tone shirts, but I love it.  I find it is a nice canvas for a great tie. We all know people have perceptions, or preconceived notions, of those who wear two tone shirts (I believe I fit very few of those) so I am cautious.  I love the shrit--fabric is Thomas Mason.

That's exactly the contrast collar styled shirt that I forever associate with money men i.e. financial managers, directors and accountants. Where I use to work in throughout the 1990s all the financial staff dressed in those type of shirts, no one else did at operational or management level in other disciplines. If I wore something like that, I would feel odd, out of place.


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#30 2012-03-04 01:19:23

Oo Bop Sh'bam
Ivy Iconoclast
From: within.
Posts: 4067

Re: The outer limits of shirting

I think people have this idea that you either have it or you don't and it's very true to say some people have a very clear natural ability or 'hand-writing' when it comes to picking colours or playing an instrument, but like with Miles, or Matisse, they were students of knowledge, and in Miles' words he couldn't wait to apply that knowledge. And with that you progress, you don't become Mr. Red with Navy, or stick to variations on the theme of grey, not that there is anything wrong with that, but if you want to push forward, or be some stand out from the crowd for al the right reasons. The first thing you have to do is to have an acceptance of what you are ignorant to. I'm here to tell you the world is no longer flat gentlemen! If you don't understand something, or afraid it will undermine what you already know you will disregard it, you will stick to the safety of dogma. Now instead of just talking about it, I've supplied examples so hopefully now people can see what I mean.

If that outfit had no green, you would have an incomplete tetrad, of blue , its complimentary yellow, and then a bit of red, that'd be like a whole bit of flavour was missing, like having peking duck wrap without the plum sauce.


''If I can't share my faith in Christ here, I'd just as soon not have to put up with people advocating drug use.''

 

#31 2012-03-04 01:32:29

Oo Bop Sh'bam
Ivy Iconoclast
From: within.
Posts: 4067

Re: The outer limits of shirting

Film Noir Buff wrote:

If you mix like colors or tones, you can do more bizarre things. For instance a bright red on a sugary pink (vs on a greyish pink) or a lemony yellow tie on a bright red butcher striped shirt (rather than a gold tie).

Im not going to lie to you here. If you were in the same room with me wearing that sweater, I'd probably bite your arm.

I would wear a fire engine red sweater vest with that. However, I do understand what you're saying.

That is basically colour blocking, the visual equivalent to the unison bend on a guitar, the colours beat against each other as their wavelengths are so similar, it is a strong visual effect, but not the whole story.

If I was to not add Green to the outfit, I'd have this pallette.

http://26.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m0cq3v674F1r118ppo1_400.png

To me, although yes that works nicely, there is no depth, it's to twee, there almost child like there is nothing to really draw you in, it's really immediate.

With the tetrad though, you have this other quality added with the green, that still works, but isn't so immediate. Don't discount any colour, cause it can easily be the one that is missing from the outfit, that would soon take it to the next level. IMO, I have to make myself by orange, as I hate it as a colour, but sometimes it is what an outfit will need. Especially if you like to wear blues.

http://30.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m0crnahWxH1r118ppo1_400.png

Last edited by Oo Bop Sh'bam (2012-03-04 01:59:53)


''If I can't share my faith in Christ here, I'd just as soon not have to put up with people advocating drug use.''

 

#32 2012-03-04 03:51:48

formby
Member
From: Wiseacre
Posts: 8359

Re: The outer limits of shirting

Oo Bop Sh'bam wrote:

Film Noir Buff wrote:

If you mix like colors or tones, you can do more bizarre things. For instance a bright red on a sugary pink (vs on a greyish pink) or a lemony yellow tie on a bright red butcher striped shirt (rather than a gold tie).

Im not going to lie to you here. If you were in the same room with me wearing that sweater, I'd probably bite your arm.

I would wear a fire engine red sweater vest with that. However, I do understand what you're saying.

That is basically colour blocking, the visual equivalent to the unison bend on a guitar, the colours beat against each other as their wavelengths are so similar, it is a strong visual effect, but not the whole story.

If I was to not add Green to the outfit, I'd have this pallette.

http://26.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m0cq3 … o1_400.png

To me, although yes that works nicely, there is no depth, it's to twee, there almost child like there is nothing to really draw you in, it's really immediate.

With the tetrad though, you have this other quality added with the green, that still works, but isn't so immediate. Don't discount any colour, cause it can easily be the one that is missing from the outfit, that would soon take it to the next level. IMO, I have to make myself by orange, as I hate it as a colour, but sometimes it is what an outfit will need. Especially if you like to wear blues.

http://30.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m0crn … o1_400.png

I'm not sure that colour theory has much practical application in the realm of clothing as it ignores context like cultural norms, notions of acceptability for a given situation, personal tastes, the influence of fashion etc.


"Dressing, like painting, should have a residual stability, plus punctuation and surprise." - Richard Merkin

Souvent me Souvient

 

#33 2012-03-04 04:04:45

Oo Bop Sh'bam
Ivy Iconoclast
From: within.
Posts: 4067

Re: The outer limits of shirting

It really has everything to do with it, colours don't stop being colours just because they are on clothes, or on a painting, or in nature itself, you can't think of things as being separated in this way. Cultural norms are built up around these observations, that then become norms, and people then stop to thinking, why they do certain things work so well? Which undermines expression, and learning. Which really should go hand in hand.

There is nothing to be lost from learning, observing, and then applying. Cause ultimately the whole idea is not to stagnate.

Last edited by Oo Bop Sh'bam (2012-03-04 04:11:01)


''If I can't share my faith in Christ here, I'd just as soon not have to put up with people advocating drug use.''

 

#34 2012-03-04 04:20:32

formby
Member
From: Wiseacre
Posts: 8359

Re: The outer limits of shirting

Film Noir Buff wrote:

When you say the bottom two, you mean the check and the stripe with some green in it? That stripe I found in a remnant shop two years ago and thought it would make a UK friendly casual shirt. Think it could even work to the office now. The lumber jack check shirt is a short sleeved shirt which will appeal to that NYC urban hip crowd.

I meant the bottom two stripes, (I didn't see the check one first time) I think they are both Acorn fabrics, the second one definitely is.

Film Noir Buff wrote:

I think you're right, it takes an outsider to appreciate what's English. My feel for what is English is constantly changing. Ties I thought very English a year ago, I now will not touch. I do get complimented by ex pat Brits over here which means that there are things the English like that they may not necessarily wear. That's tapping into the cultural mind-spring.

Yes, I think its true of cultural critique in general, it facilitates a more objective view amongst other things.

Film Noir Buff wrote:

Ringhart have a very good feeling for the English aesthetic. Thanks for suggesting them wink

You're welcome. Ringhart have some [very] bold patterns, they capture British tastes to a tee. They don't do much of that super-duper high count cotton either. So you won't get many iGents sniffing around it.

Film Noir Buff wrote:

I like that pink/blue jumbo check too. I could do that short sleeved, with double cuffs etc... and might do!

That is a very attractive shirt to the British eye (both sexes) and you'll see it done in many scales. Like many checks it can be made up both smart and casual.

Film Noir Buff wrote:

English style is not that hard to figure out as a construct. The problem is that certain tribes and individuals do their own thing. From my pov, when an English chap chooses a shirt tie combination, even when it's horrible, it still fascinates me because it's inherently English. Part of what makes English culture is the bad part too; there must always be a balance. The English are under a lot of constraints to conform. They have very strong color rules and are in love with small variations of the same old thing. I was watching this series Minder from the 80s and the shirt fabrics the men wear are still available! Sometimes the suppression explodes and a sartorial super nova results. But even these flourishes are somewhat conformist, to the extent that they still follow color rules. I suppose the area I dont examine that closely are the true eccentrics because they are too outside of what I am interested in. As it is, I have quite a few people tell me that no one else dresses like me here in the USA. That's eccentric enough.

A better experiment is to view English style through the BBC shows and films. For me, I test myself by looking at clothing items on various English websites to figure out what will sell out and what will get marked down.

Not only do individuals do their own thing but the English merchants have their own ethos'. Have you ever noticed that one tie maker will use pale pink but not red and another hot pink but not pale pink? Even for a finicky nation, England's acceptable choices are greater than any one tribe can exhaust.

I'm going to have a little think about what you're are saying here and compose, or try to compose a better response than time at the moment permits me.


"Dressing, like painting, should have a residual stability, plus punctuation and surprise." - Richard Merkin

Souvent me Souvient

 

#35 2012-03-04 08:51:01

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 9077

Re: The outer limits of shirting

formby wrote:

Film Noir Buff wrote:

When you say the bottom two, you mean the check and the stripe with some green in it? That stripe I found in a remnant shop two years ago and thought it would make a UK friendly casual shirt. Think it could even work to the office now. The lumber jack check shirt is a short sleeved shirt which will appeal to that NYC urban hip crowd.

I meant the bottom two stripes, (I didn't see the check one first time) I think they are both Acorn fabrics, the second one definitely is.

Film Noir Buff wrote:

I think you're right, it takes an outsider to appreciate what's English. My feel for what is English is constantly changing. Ties I thought very English a year ago, I now will not touch. I do get complimented by ex pat Brits over here which means that there are things the English like that they may not necessarily wear. That's tapping into the cultural mind-spring.

Yes, I think its true of cultural critique in general, it facilitates a more objective view amongst other things.

Film Noir Buff wrote:

Ringhart have a very good feeling for the English aesthetic. Thanks for suggesting them wink

You're welcome. Ringhart have some [very] bold patterns, they capture British tastes to a tee. They don't do much of that super-duper high count cotton either. So you won't get many iGents sniffing around it.

Film Noir Buff wrote:

I like that pink/blue jumbo check too. I could do that short sleeved, with double cuffs etc... and might do!

That is a very attractive shirt to the British eye (both sexes) and you'll see it done in many scales. Like many checks it can be made up both smart and casual.

Film Noir Buff wrote:

English style is not that hard to figure out as a construct. The problem is that certain tribes and individuals do their own thing. From my pov, when an English chap chooses a shirt tie combination, even when it's horrible, it still fascinates me because it's inherently English. Part of what makes English culture is the bad part too; there must always be a balance. The English are under a lot of constraints to conform. They have very strong color rules and are in love with small variations of the same old thing. I was watching this series Minder from the 80s and the shirt fabrics the men wear are still available! Sometimes the suppression explodes and a sartorial super nova results. But even these flourishes are somewhat conformist, to the extent that they still follow color rules. I suppose the area I dont examine that closely are the true eccentrics because they are too outside of what I am interested in. As it is, I have quite a few people tell me that no one else dresses like me here in the USA. That's eccentric enough.

A better experiment is to view English style through the BBC shows and films. For me, I test myself by looking at clothing items on various English websites to figure out what will sell out and what will get marked down.

Not only do individuals do their own thing but the English merchants have their own ethos'. Have you ever noticed that one tie maker will use pale pink but not red and another hot pink but not pale pink? Even for a finicky nation, England's acceptable choices are greater than any one tribe can exhaust.

I'm going to have a little think about what you're are saying here and compose, or try to compose a better response than time at the moment permits me.

I would love to see that. Where is our resident UK curmudgeon Briggs? I hoped to hear his opinions too.

Consider also what is not English as seen through the eyes of the English. For instance, that film "StormBreaker" has Mickey Rourke as the villain wearing what the designer meant to present as a crass American's take on English style. It employed a lot of yellow, yellow vest, yellow stripes in the suit etc...


http://forums.filmnoirbuff.com/uploads/thumbs/5_612106918_small.jpg

It also lets you understand how outsiders want something they like to also be English. When I started out, I was quite stubborn about what I thought was English, even when the English were telling me it wasnt especially English. Like Siddhartha, I learned to let go, and now have a better feeling for what is English. Knowing how hard it is to move the English, and how much they look down on American tastes, I am especially proud that I get some of the merchants and makers to run fabric colors/patterns that I like, or when they ask me for an opinion on something they haven't yet released.

Remember that English style has different circles and one English man will acknowledge that another is authentically English and yet never wear what he is wearing. As an outsider, I can draw from every circle for my purposes but probably most of the English have their own "look" and stick with it.

About Ringhart and Acorn. Both offer a handsome collection but neither of them make a fetish of high thread count fabrics. That approach in itself is admiringly English. And you are correct, iGents have no interest in good, honest cotton that takes a beating; but then, neither do NYC big shots. The concept of a worn, comfortable shirt is universally English. The Americans might fantasize about a different shirt every day.

The stripe in my photo with the yellows in it is from the Acorn Regent series. The stripe with green in it below is from a jobber in NYC. I might have lucked out here. I originally got that for a shirt to wear with a leather jacket in the "Life on Mars" sense of the word. However, it was too pretty for that and then it moved into the "cocktail" shirt category. Now, I think it comes across as soft enough for a suit.

The striped versions of that pink/blue check is not nearly as popular. Don't know why. But, like you say, the English could use that cloth and variations on it for a lot of uses. It's sort of a national favorite. I like it for here because Americans like it but would never think of choosing it.


Le costume fait sur mesure en tissue Fresco est le préféré des ploucs!
Facebook: FNB Dandy  Twitter: @DevilsIslandFNB Instagram: fnbdandy

 

#36 2012-03-04 09:15:45

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 9077

Re: The outer limits of shirting

fxh wrote:

ooey - careful with the jazz / colours/ tonal/ music / coltrane/ Miles  thingo - it will freak out the dudes over here on the Wardrobe* , who aren't used to your IVY musings.

* their musical tastes run to Backman Turner Overdrive Greatest Hits.

Hunh? i grew up quite preppy and that sweater might be worn but it would be worn with a pink or yellow button down shirt and a Harris tweed jacket. You might use a tie with a device, such as grasshoppers, on it or a striped tie.


Le costume fait sur mesure en tissue Fresco est le préféré des ploucs!
Facebook: FNB Dandy  Twitter: @DevilsIslandFNB Instagram: fnbdandy

 

#37 2012-03-04 09:38:12

formby
Member
From: Wiseacre
Posts: 8359

Re: The outer limits of shirting

Not related to shirts but:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-17233299

The second on school ties gives a little insight into the British males approach to style, especially the need to subvert, which I've mentioned before:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8237820.stm


"Dressing, like painting, should have a residual stability, plus punctuation and surprise." - Richard Merkin

Souvent me Souvient

 

#38 2012-03-04 10:16:48

Oo Bop Sh'bam
Ivy Iconoclast
From: within.
Posts: 4067

Re: The outer limits of shirting

Film Noir Buff wrote:

fxh wrote:

ooey - careful with the jazz / colours/ tonal/ music / coltrane/ Miles  thingo - it will freak out the dudes over here on the Wardrobe* , who aren't used to your IVY musings.

* their musical tastes run to Backman Turner Overdrive Greatest Hits.

Hunh? i grew up quite preppy and that sweater might be worn but it would be worn with a pink or yellow button down shirt and a Harris tweed jacket. You might use a tie with a device, such as grasshoppers, on it or a striped tie.

Green and pink, is as done as it gets, I thought it'd be interesting to take the blue/green and green, and combine both their complementaries, the red and the yellow. Like I said it is about moving forward with the same principles.

Dark green and pastel pink work nicely, and yellow typically sits well with green as green is a combination of yellow and blue, so it will sit well with either. But, like I said both have been done, what I did was combine both. Two analogs with their complementaries, to add another layer.


''If I can't share my faith in Christ here, I'd just as soon not have to put up with people advocating drug use.''

 

#39 2012-03-04 10:33:12

Ali Kebab
Member
Posts: 491

Re: The outer limits of shirting

Drakes has some interesting shirts for this season, albeit way way over-priced.

http://www.drakes-london.com/shirts

 

#40 2012-03-04 10:48:50

formby
Member
From: Wiseacre
Posts: 8359

Re: The outer limits of shirting

Ali Kebab wrote:

Drakes has some interesting shirts for this season, albeit way way over-priced.

http://www.drakes-london.com/shirts

Drakes prices are bordering on taking the piss.

I don't bother with them now, even though they still continue to make nice ties I view them as an iGent brand now. Sam Hober will make you a tie to specification for less than Drakes charge for a RTW. That's the way to go.

Besides, you can get nice ties all over Britain. I bought a floral tie for £30 from M&S the other week, narrower than I would normally wear but worn under a 3 piece it doesn't really matter.


"Dressing, like painting, should have a residual stability, plus punctuation and surprise." - Richard Merkin

Souvent me Souvient

 

#41 2012-03-04 13:09:10

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 9077

Re: The outer limits of shirting

formby wrote:

Ali Kebab wrote:

Drakes has some interesting shirts for this season, albeit way way over-priced.

http://www.drakes-london.com/shirts

Drakes prices are bordering on taking the piss.

I don't bother with them now, even though they still continue to make nice ties I view them as an iGent brand now. Sam Hober will make you a tie to specification for less than Drakes charge for a RTW. That's the way to go.

Besides, you can get nice ties all over Britain. I bought a floral tie for £30 from M&S the other week, narrower than I would normally wear but worn under a 3 piece it doesn't really matter.

Marks and Spencer are getting pricey.


Le costume fait sur mesure en tissue Fresco est le préféré des ploucs!
Facebook: FNB Dandy  Twitter: @DevilsIslandFNB Instagram: fnbdandy

 

#42 2012-03-04 13:29:38

formby
Member
From: Wiseacre
Posts: 8359

Re: The outer limits of shirting

Film Noir Buff wrote:

formby wrote:

Ali Kebab wrote:

Drakes has some interesting shirts for this season, albeit way way over-priced.

http://www.drakes-london.com/shirts

Drakes prices are bordering on taking the piss.

I don't bother with them now, even though they still continue to make nice ties I view them as an iGent brand now. Sam Hober will make you a tie to specification for less than Drakes charge for a RTW. That's the way to go.

Besides, you can get nice ties all over Britain. I bought a floral tie for £30 from M&S the other week, narrower than I would normally wear but worn under a 3 piece it doesn't really matter.

Marks and Spencer are getting pricey.

£30 isn't bad for a floral Duchamp-esque tie. I was impressed.

Similar to this:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51eMeKZstHL._SL500_.jpg


"Dressing, like painting, should have a residual stability, plus punctuation and surprise." - Richard Merkin

Souvent me Souvient

 

#43 2012-03-04 13:34:35

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14333

Re: The outer limits of shirting

formby wrote:

Ali Kebab wrote:

Drakes has some interesting shirts for this season, albeit way way over-priced.

http://www.drakes-london.com/shirts

Drakes prices are bordering on taking the piss.

Those 1920s looms must have some service costs!


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#44 2012-03-04 13:39:55

Simon
On A Mission
From: Dean Swift's wardrobe
Posts: 693

Re: The outer limits of shirting

I wish I had a job which would allow me to wear nice clothes. Speaking as someone who wears a boiler suit and steel toe cap boots to work, day in, day out. I find it depressing at times, really I do.


Blatant Modernist.

 

#45 2012-03-04 13:41:09

formby
Member
From: Wiseacre
Posts: 8359

Re: The outer limits of shirting

4F Hepcat wrote:

formby wrote:

Ali Kebab wrote:

Drakes has some interesting shirts for this season, albeit way way over-priced.

http://www.drakes-london.com/shirts

Drakes prices are bordering on taking the piss.

Those 1920s looms must have some service costs!

Those 1920's looms have paid for themselves several times over.


"Dressing, like painting, should have a residual stability, plus punctuation and surprise." - Richard Merkin

Souvent me Souvient

 

#46 2012-03-04 13:49:30

formby
Member
From: Wiseacre
Posts: 8359

Re: The outer limits of shirting

Simon wrote:

I wish I had a job which would allow me to wear nice clothes. Speaking as someone who wears a boiler suit and steel toe cap boots to work, day in, day out. I find it depressing at times, really I do.

I thought you were suited and booted. Is this only when you go out.

At one firm I worked at years ago, the machine shop foreman and several of the older machinists wore ties under their overalls. Whilst look dapper, well as dapper as you can in overalls it was also bloody dangerous when peering over the rapidly rotating chuck of a centre lathe.

I could tell you a mildly interesting/amusing story about that.


"Dressing, like painting, should have a residual stability, plus punctuation and surprise." - Richard Merkin

Souvent me Souvient

 

#47 2012-03-04 23:36:12

prince nez
Member
Posts: 371

Re: The outer limits of shirting

I'm generally a fan of contrast collars/cuffs. Here are a few "winter" shirts I had made a little while back. The mauve herringbone is often paired with a Duchamp tie (and on formal occasions my Penrose pocketchief) and a dark suit. I've also paired the red stripe with red/blue/white floral tie, which is a pretty "loud" combination.

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss118/ezekial_25_17/P10105771.jpg

Last edited by prince nez (2012-03-04 23:36:28)

 

#48 2012-03-05 08:45:05

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 9077

Re: The outer limits of shirting

prince nez wrote:

I'm generally a fan of contrast collars/cuffs. Here are a few "winter" shirts I had made a little while back. The mauve herringbone is often paired with a Duchamp tie (and on formal occasions my Penrose pocketchief) and a dark suit. I've also paired the red stripe with red/blue/white floral tie, which is a pretty "loud" combination.

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss11 … 105771.jpg

That lilac shirt has a good color to it. I should choose more lilac patterns but I always choose pink. Lilac in the USA is an odd choice and can elicit negative responses. It doesnt make any sense but there is a reason for it that I havent uncovered. I suppose I am just too much of a coward an go for the pink every time.

The white shirt on the bottom has an interesting texture.  I find there is a difference in effect between unintentionally "loud" combinations and intentional ones.


Le costume fait sur mesure en tissue Fresco est le préféré des ploucs!
Facebook: FNB Dandy  Twitter: @DevilsIslandFNB Instagram: fnbdandy

 

#49 2012-03-05 11:42:47

formby
Member
From: Wiseacre
Posts: 8359

Re: The outer limits of shirting

Film Noir Buff wrote:

prince nez wrote:

I'm generally a fan of contrast collars/cuffs. Here are a few "winter" shirts I had made a little while back. The mauve herringbone is often paired with a Duchamp tie (and on formal occasions my Penrose pocketchief) and a dark suit. I've also paired the red stripe with red/blue/white floral tie, which is a pretty "loud" combination.

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss11 … 105771.jpg

That lilac shirt has a good color to it. I should choose more lilac patterns but I always choose pink. Lilac in the USA is an odd choice and can elicit negative responses. It doesnt make any sense but there is a reason for it that I havent uncovered. I suppose I am just too much of a coward an go for the pink every time.

The white shirt on the bottom has an interesting texture.  I find there is a difference in effect between unintentionally "loud" combinations and intentional ones.

The white one looks like pique.

I like the lilac herringbone. Not keen on the red stripe though but might wear it in a check.


"Dressing, like painting, should have a residual stability, plus punctuation and surprise." - Richard Merkin

Souvent me Souvient

 

#50 2012-03-05 11:51:22

Simon
On A Mission
From: Dean Swift's wardrobe
Posts: 693

Re: The outer limits of shirting

formby wrote:

Simon wrote:

I wish I had a job which would allow me to wear nice clothes. Speaking as someone who wears a boiler suit and steel toe cap boots to work, day in, day out. I find it depressing at times, really I do.

I thought you were suited and booted. Is this only when you go out.

At one firm I worked at years ago, the machine shop foreman and several of the older machinists wore ties under their overalls. Whilst look dapper, well as dapper as you can in overalls it was also bloody dangerous when peering over the rapidly rotating chuck of a centre lathe.

I could tell you a mildly interesting/amusing story about that.

Yep, only when I go out. I've a mate who's a suedehead but apart from him no one I know is interested in clothes. My mates think its a very English thing to wear a tie on a night out. They think I'm a bit loopy when we meet in town and I've got a suit on. I even wear jackets and ties in the day saturdays. Yes, even a suit somtimes and why not?


Blatant Modernist.

 

Board footer

Powered by PunBB
© Copyright 2002–2008 Rickard Andersson