You are not logged in.

  • Index
  •  » Talk Ivy
  •  » Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

#1 2014-08-12 09:41:40

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15923

Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

I love coffee and Mrs. WM sent me this link this morning.  A look at coffee bar culture in London in the late '50s. 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nsRHHcq1P8


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

#2 2014-08-12 09:43:28

CaptainMaddox
Member
From: UK
Posts: 329

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

pearoast.

Last edited by CaptainMaddox (2014-08-12 09:43:43)

 

#3 2014-08-12 09:57:30

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15923

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

Is that a type of coffee?  Or are you saying this is a repost?


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

#4 2014-08-12 10:05:58

IvyLeagueOfGentlemen
Ivyist
From: Grace Brothers
Posts: 1145

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

Worried Man wrote:

I love coffee and Mrs. WM sent me this link this morning.  A look at coffee bar culture in London in the late '50s. 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nsRHHcq1P8

If you're into this kinda thing WM, there's some really cool books you can buy on the subject.

Also, there are lots of pocket sized book guides to some of London's well established coffee bars that are still standing today. Along with some of the more recent editions.

Italian immigrants that opened coffee shops in London that became cool hangouts back in the day to some of the hipsters of the day were an influential part of it's history in many respects.

It's all part of swinging London, mod, hip, ivy; blah blah blah....


“As I looked out into that night sky, with all those infinite stars, it made me realise how unimportant they are.”

Peter Cook

 

#5 2014-08-12 10:16:41

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15923

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

Diners and coffee shops were popular gathering places for the US Beat culture too.  Sipping some coffee while listening to some Blue Note jazz, now that is my kind of way to spend some time.


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

#6 2014-08-12 10:31:45

IvyLeagueOfGentlemen
Ivyist
From: Grace Brothers
Posts: 1145

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

Worried Man wrote:

Diners and coffee shops were popular gathering places for the US Beat culture too.  Sipping some coffee while listening to some Blue Note jazz, now that is my kind of way to spend some time.

Diner's are quite unique to the US I guess?

I really like those old Airstream style diners that you see in old movies. Not sure if there were actually related to Airstream?

There used to be one of those in Covent Garden many years ago that seemed to just disappear over night....


“As I looked out into that night sky, with all those infinite stars, it made me realise how unimportant they are.”

Peter Cook

 

#7 2014-08-12 10:52:49

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15923

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

A real diner, or "greasy spoon", is still one of my favorite places to grab breakfast.  Typically the food isn't high quality and the coffee is usually cheap Folgers or Maxwell House or Eight O'Clock, but I seek out places like this when I'm traveling.  They used to be far more plentiful, probably reaching their heyday in the 1940s and '50s, coinciding with America's explosion of highway automobile travel, and yes, they were often in flashy and brightly lit prefabricated metal boxes on the roadside - like an Airstream but most often the diners were in units specifically built by a diner car company or were in converted trolley or railroad cars.

Likewise, there are plenty of books and websites dedicated to America's love affair with the diner.  Here's a shot of the menu board at a local diner that's been serving since 1956.  A great breakfast spot, and actually right on Georgia Tech's campus.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_Dg4kqTQdI5k/TQaRWNBE9DI/AAAAAAAAAao/KwdUAfjclgw/s1600/IMG_0826.JPG


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

#8 2014-08-12 10:55:33

doghouse
Member
Posts: 5083

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

I read a good (and depressing) article not too long ago about the disappearing American diner not too long ago, I'll have to look for it.

Huge cultural icon that will be lost.


Hide thy infants, hide thy Lady, and hide thy husband, alas they art forcing sexual intercourse upon the entire populace. - Wm Shakespeare

 

#9 2014-08-12 11:01:00

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15923

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

There are some places that are calling themselves "diners" that really aren't.  They have these hip modern menus with gourmet stuff on them.  When I go into a diner I want some damn bright yellow scrambled eggs, some toast or a biscuit, some cheap coffee, maybe a coke, and choice of sausage, bacon, or country ham.  That's IT!!

The coffee needs to be served in a mug like this too.

http://www.bryanchina.com/Mugs/BEM-090B%20Mugs%20Diner%20Mug%20Eggshell.JPG


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

#10 2014-08-12 11:10:41

oxford cloth button down
Member
Posts: 1178

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

I am a fan of diners myself. In general, the food is cheap, the food is real, and the atmosphere is always homey. Even in the middle of America the diner is dying. There used to be 3-4 in my city. Now there is only 1. However, there are plenty near me in even smaller towns.

There is an Airstream type diner not too far. I will take pics the next time that I am out that way. The builing that is generally behind me in most of my  pics had a great diner up until a few years ago. I miss it the most.

That place looks great WM.

Last edited by oxford cloth button down (2014-08-12 11:13:13)

 

#11 2014-08-12 11:15:43

IvyLeagueOfGentlemen
Ivyist
From: Grace Brothers
Posts: 1145

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

Worried Man wrote:

A real diner, or "greasy spoon", is still one of my favorite places to grab breakfast.  Typically the food isn't high quality and the coffee is usually cheap Folgers or Maxwell House or Eight O'Clock, but I seek out places like this when I'm traveling.  They used to be far more plentiful, probably reaching their heyday in the 1940s and '50s, coinciding with America's explosion of highway automobile travel, and yes, they were often in flashy and brightly lit prefabricated metal boxes on the roadside - like an Airstream but most often the diners were in units specifically built by a diner car company or were in converted trolley or railroad cars.

Likewise, there are plenty of books and websites dedicated to America's love affair with the diner.  Here's a shot of the menu board at a local diner that's been serving since 1956.  A great breakfast spot, and actually right on Georgia Tech's campus.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_Dg4kqTQdI5k/T … G_0826.JPG

I must admit that I'm a tad disappointed with that menu WM..

I wanna see Pastrami, Danish pastry, hash browns, easy over eggs, maple syrup and pancakes - just like in the movies (wink)


“As I looked out into that night sky, with all those infinite stars, it made me realise how unimportant they are.”

Peter Cook

 

#12 2014-08-12 12:01:26

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15923

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

^
Well, this one is particularly Southern, and pastrami doesn't feature.  There are some good delis around that serve up the pastrami.  Here's a link to the Silver Skillet's full menu. 
http://www.thesilverskillet.com/menu.asp


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

#13 2014-08-12 12:12:18

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15923

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

oxford cloth button down wrote:

I am a fan of diners myself. In general, the food is cheap, the food is real, and the atmosphere is always homey. Even in the middle of America the diner is dying. There used to be 3-4 in my city. Now there is only 1. However, there are plenty near me in even smaller towns.

There is an Airstream type diner not too far. I will take pics the next time that I am out that way. The builing that is generally behind me in most of my  pics had a great diner up until a few years ago. I miss it the most.

That place looks great WM.

Yes.  Get some pics!  Pot 'N Pan was a hole-in-the-wall greasy spoon I used to frequent.  They closed recently to make way for a modern apartment complex.  I went for breakfast and the building wasn't even there anymore!!! 

http://collections.atlantahistorycenter.com/export/get_item_viewer_image.php?alias=/southline&i=36&height=600&width=600


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

#14 2014-08-12 12:15:32

stanshall
Moderator
From: Gilligan's Island
Posts: 10218

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

ILOG, pastrami is not a diner staple, never was ... however, corned beef hash used to be a feature of most diner menus ....

great shot of the Silver Skillet menu WM ...  that's the lunch section of the menu .... it all looks pretty spectacular ... I'm into the country ham and the biscuits for breakfast, and the pork chops, yam souffle, collard greens, rice & gravy, and mac & cheese for lunch .......


"bow wow wow yippie yo yippie yay"

 

#15 2014-08-12 12:21:08

Acton_Baby
Member
From: West London
Posts: 3671

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

Worried Man wrote:

^
Well, this one is particularly Southern, and pastrami doesn't feature.  There are some good delis around that serve up the pastrami.  Here's a link to the Silver Skillet's full menu. 
http://www.thesilverskillet.com/menu.asp

Mmmmmmmm !!!
Chicken Fried Steak smothered in gravy, now you're talking. Some mash and fried okra on the side.
Sweet ice tea as a beverage.


"I have about 100 pairs of pyjamas. I like to see people dressed comfortably."
Hugh Hefner

 

#16 2014-08-12 12:23:20

doghouse
Member
Posts: 5083

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries


Hide thy infants, hide thy Lady, and hide thy husband, alas they art forcing sexual intercourse upon the entire populace. - Wm Shakespeare

 

#17 2014-08-12 12:31:01

IvyLeagueOfGentlemen
Ivyist
From: Grace Brothers
Posts: 1145

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

stanshall wrote:

ILOG, pastrami is not a diner staple, never was ... however, corned beef hash used to be a feature of most diner menus.......

Maybe I'm getting diner's and deli's confused?

I always associate Pastrami with a thick New York accent, hence the tongue in cheek post.. (not beef tongue)

It's all beef at the end of the day (wink)


“As I looked out into that night sky, with all those infinite stars, it made me realise how unimportant they are.”

Peter Cook

 

#18 2014-08-12 13:00:49

Oliver
Member
From: San Francisco
Posts: 6321

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

American diners were typically pre-war pre-fab buildings made by specific Dining Car Companies like Worcester, Kullman, Sterling (streamliners), etc; hence the designation. They were mainly scattered around the Northeast and Midwest and I don't think any remaining diners exist outside of these regions. That Guy Fieri idiot has his diners and drive-ins show but I don't think he's ever visited a single diner or drive-in on an episode. Lots of people misuse the term and call any hashouse that slings burgers over formica countertops and terrazzo floors a diner, but there are sadly very few real diners left in America.

 

#19 2014-08-12 13:07:47

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15923

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

^
That guy bugs the heck outta me.  The so-called "diners" he visits are exactly the kind I'm talking about.  An $18 hamburger marinated in bourbon and smothered in some kind of caramelized onions served with a side of fancy tortilla chips isn't going to be anywhere on the menu in a real greasy spoon.


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

#20 2014-08-12 13:10:09

IvyLeagueOfGentlemen
Ivyist
From: Grace Brothers
Posts: 1145

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries


“As I looked out into that night sky, with all those infinite stars, it made me realise how unimportant they are.”

Peter Cook

 

#21 2014-08-12 13:12:06

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15923

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

The long-forgotten lunch counter could also be lumped into this topic.  They were pretty much a diner counter stuffed inside a department store like Woolworths, or better yet, the local pharmacy.  They usually served typical diner fare, but maybe a little heavier on the sandwich selection.  These have also gone the way of the diner, but can still sometimes be found in small American towns.


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

#22 2014-08-12 13:16:56

doghouse
Member
Posts: 5083

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

My Grandma use to be a waitress at a counter here.


Hide thy infants, hide thy Lady, and hide thy husband, alas they art forcing sexual intercourse upon the entire populace. - Wm Shakespeare

 

#23 2014-08-12 13:26:12

Oliver
Member
From: San Francisco
Posts: 6321

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

IvyLeagueOfGentlemen wrote:

stanshall wrote:

ILOG, pastrami is not a diner staple, never was ... however, corned beef hash used to be a feature of most diner menus.......

Maybe I'm getting diner's and deli's confused?

I always associate Pastrami with a thick New York accent, hence the tongue in cheek post.. (not beef tongue)

It's all beef at the end of the day (wink)

Pastrami is synonymous with East Coast Jewish Delis. It's immigrant food from Eastern Europe, Lithuania, Russia, and Hunagry. A lot of the food developped out of necessity as Jews migrated from country to country. Dark ryes, corned beef, beef brisket, cheesecake, blintzes, bialys, etc. are the sort of staple fare you find in traditional kosher delis and they chronicle the history of Jewish migration and it's heritage of a gathering place where displaced people found community. Three quarters of all Eastern European Jews migrated to NYC between 1881 and 1924. They were the largest single immigrant group in New York by 1910. Living conditions were poor, people spilled out from their tenements and into the streets and it became the focus of their daily life. The Lower East Side was flooded with pushcart vendors in the early 1900's. Thsi was where immigrants came together to debate religion and politics, and it's the Ashkenazim food like matzo ball soup, kugel, potato latkes, etc. that became the standard menus most associated with East Coast delis, where that culture of conversation and community moved from the streets to tables. It's traditionally all pesant food. There's a terrific book that I picked up at Langer's last year called "America's Great Delis: Recipes and Traditions from Coast to Coast" that I recommend. It chronicles the history and evolution of delis from the introduction of staple foods like borscht in 6000 BCE to the seltzer water sold from horse-drawn carts in New York City in 1790 to Dr. Brown's in 1869 and on and on... it also covers all foods from horseradish to schmaltz and includes recipes for everything from Barney Greengrass' cheese blintzes to Carnegie Deli's matzo ball soup, Eisenberg's meat loaf, Russ & Daughter's pickled lox, Ratner's onion rolls, Lindy's cheesecakes, and countless other gems.

 

#24 2014-08-12 13:28:13

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15923

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

Evans Pharmacy, in Conyers, Georgia still operates this soda fountain.  Burgers, dogs, ice cream, shakes, sodas...   

http://mainstreet.conyersga.com/portals/11/Merchant%20Directory/Dining/Merchant%20Pictures/evans%202.jpg


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

#25 2014-08-12 13:29:21

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15923

Re: Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

I'm sure most Southern diner owners would scoff at the thought of offering pastrami on the menu.  Sort of like asking a Northern deli owner why grits aren't on the menu.


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 
  • Index
  •  » Talk Ivy
  •  » Coffee bars, diners, forgotten roadside eateries

Board footer

Powered by PunBB
© Copyright 2002–2008 Rickard Andersson