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#1 2016-08-06 04:40:20

Beestonplace
Member
Posts: 1379

How Harvie & Hudson have changed

After the closure of the nice "weekend" shop in Knightsbridge, the smaller shop opposite New & Lingwood, the one with the nice "marble" sign over the door, is now gone too.

The new logo is awful, and the new, grey-ish labels look dirty and cheap.

The product range has changed quite a bit. Gone are the wild variety of butcher's stripes, and eccentric multi-colour stripes.

The ties with the LSD-inspired, almost Duchamp-like coloured patterns - gone.

H&H have become "Modern".

Last edited by Beestonplace (2016-08-06 04:43:41)

 

#2 2016-08-06 04:45:06

Bop
Member
Posts: 7661

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

http://blog.harvieandhudson.com/wp-content/uploads/Greg_5663.jpg

Their current brand merchandiser..according to the blog..

I used to like popping in there a few years ago not sure what its like now..

Last edited by Bop (2016-08-06 04:45:34)

 

#3 2016-08-06 05:24:06

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14316

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

I see he's nailed the I'm just going to produce a white pigeon out of my blazer pocket look down to a tee. What is it with pocket squares and these people?


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#4 2016-08-06 07:40:39

doghouse
Member
Posts: 5085

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

They closed the smaller shop, which incidentally is the one I used to frequent, because they expanded the big one and wanted to consolidate. Pure business move, but I am a little sad over it. Richard H and Mark M worked out of the little one.

The upside is their bespoke operation is 100% in house now, which is cool.


Hide thy infants, hide thy Lady, and hide thy husband, alas they art forcing sexual intercourse upon the entire populace. - Wm Shakespeare

 

#5 2016-08-06 08:14:00

Beestonplace
Member
Posts: 1379

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

But - what about the poor American tourists who are now going to be all disappointed that instead of the old Miss Moneypenny atmosphere the new shop is all halogen downlights and blonde wood?

 

#6 2016-08-06 09:07:05

doghouse
Member
Posts: 5085

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

Que sera and all that shit.


Hide thy infants, hide thy Lady, and hide thy husband, alas they art forcing sexual intercourse upon the entire populace. - Wm Shakespeare

 

#7 2016-08-07 09:38:37

Beestonplace
Member
Posts: 1379

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

Buying stuff in the old shop somehow felt right. It was nostalgic, somehow politically incorrect, many scruffy old customers turned up, the pyjamas on the shelves in plastic wrappers...

Nowadays it looks and feels like a chic boutique, in all possibly bad ways.

 

#8 2016-10-14 16:35:04

comrade
New member
From: palo alto, CA
Posts: 7

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

Beestonplace wrote:

But - what about the poor American tourists who are now going to be all disappointed that instead of the old Miss Moneypenny atmosphere the new shop is all halogen downlights and blonde wood?

After a hiatus of 16 years, I just returned from a week in London. I am afraid that the above comments
are a very accurate metaphor for contemporary London. During my visit Regents Street was closed to traffic
for an NFL extravaganza to promote an exhibition game for American Football!  Commander Whitehead,
Terry Thomas and Sir John Gielgud must be spinning in their graves

 

#9 2016-10-15 00:33:12

woofboxer
Devil's Ivy Advocate
From: Staines-upon-Thames, Middlesex
Posts: 5863

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

Beestonplace wrote:

Buying stuff in the old shop somehow felt right. It was nostalgic, somehow politically incorrect, many scruffy old customers turned up, the pyjamas on the shelves in plastic wrappers...

Nowadays it looks and feels like a chic boutique, in all possibly bad ways.

I initially read that as 'scruffy old customers turned up in their pyjamas'.

It is unfortunate to see these old places one by one, either closing or, changing to a more fashion forward pitch. It seems that unless you have a niche or go really high end there is no future in selling clothes that last and don't go out of style.


'I'm not that keen on the Average Look .......ever'. 
John Simons

 

#10 2016-10-15 03:15:46

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14316

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

comrade wrote:

Beestonplace wrote:

But - what about the poor American tourists who are now going to be all disappointed that instead of the old Miss Moneypenny atmosphere the new shop is all halogen downlights and blonde wood?

After a hiatus of 16 years, I just returned from a week in London. I am afraid that the above comments
are a very accurate metaphor for contemporary London. During my visit Regents Street was closed to traffic
for an NFL extravaganza to promote an exhibition game for American Football!  Commander Whitehead,
Terry Thomas and Sir John Gielgud must be spinning in their graves

London is what it says on the tin: a vast sprawling extravaganza of a world city, but without the modernity and heat of Dubai, although relatively speaking its the hottest place in the UK. It lost it's record as the world's largest city back in the late 1940's, the mission now is to get this title back as a city state separate to the geographical island around it. It's an unfinished experiment in humanity, diversity, hipsterism and all that jazz. Or perhaps it remains the city in Vaughn Williams London Symphony.


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#11 2016-10-15 03:17:11

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14316

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

woofboxer wrote:

Beestonplace wrote:

Buying stuff in the old shop somehow felt right. It was nostalgic, somehow politically incorrect, many scruffy old customers turned up, the pyjamas on the shelves in plastic wrappers...

Nowadays it looks and feels like a chic boutique, in all possibly bad ways.

I initially read that as 'scruffy old customers turned up in their pyjamas'.

It is unfortunate to see these old places one by one, either closing or, changing to a more fashion forward pitch. It seems that unless you have a niche or go really high end there is no future in selling clothes that last and don't go out of style.

Cheap as Primark, or high-end niche there is no future in-between. The iGent pound and dollar wavers between the extremities too, so they won't save them.


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#12 2016-10-15 06:02:53

Johnny's Lobbster
Member
Posts: 59

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

But then how you you explain the relative succes of mid-market clobber like Polo RL, Gant, Tommy Hilfiger and even Barbour?

Biggest problem for me is still the current retail system. If companies want to be successfull they have to find a way to avoid the middleman and sell directly to the customer. Best example are William Lockie. If I order from them directly a lambswool jumper is 100 incl. shipping, at my local shop it's 140. With cashmere it's even worse.

 

#13 2016-10-15 07:50:28

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14316

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

Johnny's Lobbster wrote:

But then how you you explain the relative succes of mid-market clobber like Polo RL, Gant, Tommy Hilfiger and even Barbour?

Good point, not sure I would include Barbour in there though. Tommy Hilfinger always struck me as a late comer to the brand as lifestyle when RL had already exploited and explored the phenomena to ultimate cash register effect. RL outside of the US was rare at one time and prohibitively expensive, but then they went all Chaps labels and the price and availability became almost for everyone, yet they still held onto the image of the gear of the US elite. Perhaps, for a time, this was true.

If you go to any of these outlet villages, the RL store is always the most busy with customers and a lot of is very cheap, not Primark cheap, but a label with the perceived cache of RL, cheap enough. Some of it is good quality too, the chinos for thirty-odd Euros in the outlet stores is good value IMCO.


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#14 2016-10-15 13:02:20

Beestonplace
Member
Posts: 1379

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

Is it true that they manufacture a seperate "outlet centre" line? I had the impression that for example the heavy cotton sweaters were of considerably lesser quality than one I bought in a RL boutique.

 

#15 2016-10-16 07:51:46

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14316

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

Some lines yes, such as Brooks Brothers "346" range, but a lot of last season's and what hasn't sold in the RL boutique will inevitably find their way into the outlet shops. Some of it is, some of it isn't.


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#16 2016-10-16 08:05:18

interested observer
Member
Posts: 65

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

4F Hepcat wrote:

Some lines yes, such as Brooks Brothers "346" range, but a lot of last season's and what hasn't sold in the RL boutique will inevitably find their way into the outlet shops. Some of it is, some of it isn't.

At least in the USA, the vast majority of the stuff in the RL (and Brooks Bros) outlets is made specifically for the outlets.  In the RL outlets, there are usually one or two racks of stuff from the real RL stores, the balance I believe is made for the outlets.  In BB, this is absolutely the case, almost no BB main-line merchandise is in there.  If you look at the number of outlets stores and volume, there is no way they could stock them mainly with main-line overstock.  For many of these companies, including RL, the 'outlet' business is a big chunk of their revenues.  RL have 144 main line stores and 272 outlet stores. 

Retailers who buy from RL end up with their own overstock/unsold, but this stuff doesn't go back to RL or the outlet stores, at least as a general matter.


"Any formal attack on ignorance is bound to fail because the masses are always ready to defend their most precious possession - their ignorance. "
Hendrick Van Loon

Better to be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt.

 

#17 2016-10-16 08:29:33

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14316

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

Certainly here in the Netherlands and also the UK, at least some of the stuff ends up in the outlet stores, I've seen it. Retailers are another matter as you rightly point out, but definitely the RL branded boutique stuff ends up in the outlet villages. Of course, I am not referring to the Purple Label lines and such like. But we shouldn't be under any illusions that a bog standard RL OCBD in a boutique is somehow of a higher quality and more rare than the fare in the outlet stores. It's the same gear, made from the same cloth, to the same specifications, in the same offshore factories.


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#18 2016-10-16 09:57:00

Beestonplace
Member
Posts: 1379

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

I think the Roermond stuff is even nastier than the "real" stuff.

 

#19 2016-10-16 13:32:06

woofboxer
Devil's Ivy Advocate
From: Staines-upon-Thames, Middlesex
Posts: 5863

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

I bought three Brooks Brothers ties for $129 (Canadian) in one of the outlet stores at Niagra, all classic, enduring BB patterns. 90% of the stock in there was last years 346 or Red Fleece, but you can find the good stuff too.


'I'm not that keen on the Average Look .......ever'. 
John Simons

 

#20 2016-10-17 00:33:30

Beestonplace
Member
Posts: 1379

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

So, H&H have sent me an email - they want me to send me a gift.

 

#21 2016-10-17 01:11:11

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14316

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

Beestonplace wrote:

I think the Roermond stuff is even nastier than the "real" stuff.

Yeah, that's a particularly shoddy experience. The best two outlets in the MacArthur Glen designer outlet stables is the Venice one and the one in Ellesmere Port.

The one in Venice is actually quite good and discerning, they even have a Brioni store and the one in Ellesmere Port is so vast as to be engaging in the time it takes to walk around in the forelorn hope that there is something there for everyone. And you also have the big Marks & Spencer's nearby.


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#22 2016-10-17 09:36:19

Johnny's Lobbster
Member
Posts: 59

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

What's so bad about Roermond? It's as awful as most other outlets in Europe. The Mall in Tuscany was escpecially bad and seemed mostly aimed at Chinese and Arabs. I liked the one in Bicester though. They had losts of merchandise from their stores and some at great prices. RL had many Purple Label items and Loro Piana wasn't only made up of strange colours as was the case in Roermond.

If you want to buy quality stuff, look for brands that have their own outlets at their production facilities e.g. Northhampton shoe makers or some of the Italian companies producing suits or knitwear.

I don't get how people are so desperate for outlets. Over the last few years the selection during the sales has been excellent and usually at discounts of 30-50%.

 

#23 2016-10-18 09:37:23

Beestonplace
Member
Posts: 1379

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

ok bzut this thread is about H6H

 

#24 2016-10-30 05:57:44

Beestonplace
Member
Posts: 1379

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

I am really sad about all this. Usually, H&H were my Autumn and Winter go-to places when in London. The larger shop on the corner had this wonderful 1970ies feel to it. And their gear, while largely rebranded and overpriced, was nice, in a midly eccentric/traditional way.

Now they sell slim fit merino sweater with a small v neck. Do I need to say more?

 

#25 2017-01-25 12:24:41

Beestonplace
Member
Posts: 1379

Re: How Harvie & Hudson have changed

http://www.filmnoirbuff.com/article/har … t-to-knots

This is my favoured FNB article. But is outdated. H&H dont sell that nice stuff anymore.

 

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