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#1 2018-01-10 14:25:13

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: The Great White North
Posts: 1765

The ideal wardrobe

Interesting comments on this piece over at Ivy Style

http://www.ivy-style.com/dream-team-hel … drobe.html

Two in particular caught my eye... Insanely comprehensive comment by "Mike" outlining every single item... contrasted with "S.E." who writes:

The dirty (or not so dirty) little secret–(and we all know it)–is that a couple of 3-patch blazers (tropical, flannel), a gray herringbone tweed jacket, gray bottoms (tropical, flannel), handful of repp ties, a shetland crewneck (gray or oatmeal), a half a dozen OCBDs, khakis aplenty. and penny loafers* will take anybody a long, long way. Those of us who have become profligate in our collecting–we indulge sartorially in something akin to St. Paul’s “third heaven,” but there’s something to be said for the basics.

I'm moving more and more towards the S.E. side of things (seeing the forest), after spending a long time seeing just the trees, like Mike...


"Always take your job seriously, never yourself." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

 

#2 2018-01-10 18:44:44

mhalat
Member
Posts: 74

Re: The ideal wardrobe

It seems to me that the question comes down to whether you view this as a practical pursuit, or a hobby. S.E. is dead-on, from the point of view of building a wardrobe that one can wear on a daily basis, if that is all one wants to do. If you want to trot out the old chestnut of authenticity, he is also more on the money - it requires a neurotic mind to obsess over the minutiae of how one dresses, and is a mentality that was probably foreign to most of the guys in the vintage photos we trade. Some in this space seem to believe that men in from the Victorian Age through the 1960s (give or take) obsessed over their attire. Having been around a lot of old Ivy Leaguers etc in my life, I'd issue the counter-argument that a lot of what we place on a pedestal were just considered clothes, and dressing was absorbed by osmosis.

Long story short, I view dressing and clothes as a fun pastime (and am, frankly, not married to Ivy), with the fringe benefit that it has also helped me earn more money, and get noticed by ladies from time to time. I'm not in this to be practical, I'm in it to have fun.

Last edited by mhalat (2018-01-10 18:45:10)

 

#3 2018-01-10 19:34:40

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: The Great White North
Posts: 1765

Re: The ideal wardrobe

mhalat wrote:

It seems to me that the question comes down to whether you view this as a practical pursuit, or a hobby. S.E. is dead-on, from the point of view of building a wardrobe that one can wear on a daily basis, if that is all one wants to do. If you want to trot out the old chestnut of authenticity, he is also more on the money - it requires a neurotic mind to obsess over the minutiae of how one dresses, and is a mentality that was probably foreign to most of the guys in the vintage photos we trade. Some in this space seem to believe that men in from the Victorian Age through the 1960s (give or take) obsessed over their attire. Having been around a lot of old Ivy Leaguers etc in my life, I'd issue the counter-argument that a lot of what we place on a pedestal were just considered clothes, and dressing was absorbed by osmosis.

Long story short, I view dressing and clothes as a fun pastime (and am, frankly, not married to Ivy), with the fringe benefit that it has also helped me earn more money, and get noticed by ladies from time to time. I'm not in this to be practical, I'm in it to have fun.

Ha! Great point mhalat... I think we're all very lucky to have stan here on TI, he always reminds us that a big component of Ivy is not obsessing over it but rather just wearing it...

Looking through old yearbooks lately, I can say you're right, not just with the Ivy League but with any place the look was fostered... people just wore what they wore...

I think the best way is probably to build a wardrobe with Mike's mindset, then wear it with S.E.'s...

I do think Ivy Style emphasizes the Ivy look as a "Collect 'Em All!" type thing, just due to CC's personal outlook (nothing negative about that, just the way he does things)... But I do I think viewing it that way can inherently work against the look itself, as you point out...


"Always take your job seriously, never yourself." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

 

#4 2018-01-10 23:48:08

Babbling Brooks
Member
Posts: 326

Re: The ideal wardrobe

Like mhalat I got into Ivy for the drugs and the women.

Last edited by Babbling Brooks (2018-01-11 10:57:48)


Dirty bucks I want you, dirty bucks I need you, woh-oh.

 

#5 2018-01-11 04:19:20

mhalat
Member
Posts: 74

Re: The ideal wardrobe

@B_B - I agree that Stan is a treasure! And, speaking to my own neurosis, I totally have a 'best of' sheet from the late 70s prep checklist stuck in one of my OneNote notebooks. Am not /so/ obsessive that I am working through it as a shopping list, just fun inspiration when there's a hole burning in my pocket.

@Babbling Brooks - Ha! Ever since my mother started dressing me in sailor suits as a toddler, I've drawn a lot of inspiration from Donald Duck; getting into lots of trouble, but trying to look semi respectable while doing so. Apparently, the Norwegian sweater I was wearing when I met my current girlfriend really did it for her, which is strange, but I'll take it.

 

#6 2018-01-11 08:19:13

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15981

Re: The ideal wardrobe

The fact that the legit stuff is much harder to procure now than in 1960 is what makes me a little neurotic about the clothes I have.  If I snag a hole in a Shetland sweater or a vintage tweed sack I can't have Mrs. Worried Man pick up a reasonably-priced replacement on the way home from the market. 

I have this sense of foreboding that the stuff will be even more scarce 15, 20, 30 years on.  Like, what if O'Connell's went out of business?  I, for one, would be really fuc#ed.  So I think this notion makes me take more care and consideration with my wardrobe.  Has also fostered the collecting habit: "Well, even if you don't wear it often, just hang on to it because it's a nice piece.  You'll regret getting rid of it because you'll never find it again."

But if I hit the lottery or something and money was no consideration I'd consider starting over from scratch and just hit O'C's, Press, H. Stockton, and having an impeccably tailored, staple wardrobe like the guy in the OP.


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

#7 2018-01-11 09:43:22

stanshall
Moderator
From: Gilligan's Island
Posts: 11201

Re: The ideal wardrobe

Berkeley_Breathes wrote:

... I think we're all very lucky to have stan here on TI, he always reminds us that a big component of Ivy is not obsessing over it but rather just wearing it...

mhalat wrote:

@B_B - I agree that Stan is a treasure! And, speaking to my own neurosis, I totally have a 'best of' sheet from the late 70s prep checklist stuck in one of my OneNote notebooks. Am not /so/ obsessive that I am working through it as a shopping list, just fun inspiration when there's a hole burning in my pocket.

thanks guys, I appreciate the kind words very much ... .

I looked at the detailed checklist Beebs linked to in the original post, and had some thoughts, which I'll try to put down later, but for now I would say that personally I have everything on that list multiplied by five, except for the raincoat, which I don't actually have at all, having outgrown the last one I bought in the early '80s from the Andover Shop .....

don't have a camel hair polo coat either, what will I do?

I also don't have three navy blazers anymore, I just wear the one all-season 3/2 patch sack I have to death ....

that's a lot of clothing anyway though, more than most people need, more than most people can get to, it takes years to work through the full rotation, especially because I'll always just wear a pair of poplin walk shorts or a pair of jeans and one of my dozens and dozens of t-shirts and go barefoot if I can get away with it ......

that truncated list is helpful, while the comprehensive long list seems inorganic (fedora, trilby, double-breasted polo coat?) and contains a few weird pieces of advice, i.e., "[f]ly front shirt can be worn with suits," which made me laugh.  A fly-front shirt worn with a suit is like something Dr. Evil would wear ......

A double-breasted polo coat is a costume for a Gatsby fantasy, I'm looking at this one modern photo of a guy wearing one, with a patchwork tweed flat cap, and a black watch scarf, and a knit tie, and a tweed jacket, and flannels, and some kind of tan shoes, and he's smoking a pipe, while sitting on stone steps somewhere in NYC and it cracks me up, somebody's playing dress-up, and it seems silly to amass an unnecessarily large "comprehensive" wardrobe either to re-enact the golden age of Ivy or just to tick things off a list.

So it's not smart to get things you don't need and can't really use just because some article, old or new, says you simply must have it, but by the same token if you wear a shirt, tie, and suit every day you should have quite a bit more than a few of each so you can establish a rotation, not wear things out too fast, and enjoy having some choices.

And only wear really good shoes (when you're not wearing your dirty canvas sneakers). 

buy clothes that you actually need and that you'll wear, don't buy it all at once, don't obsess unnecessarily over any of it, and stay away from the dry cleaner.


"bow wow wow yippie yo yippie yay"

 

#8 2018-01-11 10:42:30

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: The Great White North
Posts: 1765

Re: The ideal wardrobe

Worried Man wrote:

The fact that the legit stuff is much harder to procure now than in 1960 is what makes me a little neurotic about the clothes I have.  If I snag a hole in a Shetland sweater or a vintage tweed sack I can't have Mrs. Worried Man pick up a reasonably-priced replacement on the way home from the market. 

I have this sense of foreboding that the stuff will be even more scarce 15, 20, 30 years on.  Like, what if O'Connell's went out of business?  I, for one, would be really fuc#ed.  So I think this notion makes me take more care and consideration with my wardrobe.  Has also fostered the collecting habit: "Well, even if you don't wear it often, just hang on to it because it's a nice piece.  You'll regret getting rid of it because you'll never find it again."

But if I hit the lottery or something and money was no consideration I'd consider starting over from scratch and just hit O'C's, Press, H. Stockton, and having an impeccably tailored, staple wardrobe like the guy in the OP.

Or perhaps you could be called... worried, man?

https://media.giphy.com/media/2bRl9YbY60FMs/giphy.gif

But yes, I agree completely with this point. I actually like having older stuff - a lot of my shirts and all of my sport coats and ties are used, though I buy suits new because I can't deal with the hassle of alterations on trousers, it just isn't worth it on my budget, and I think even if I came into a no strings attached windfall I'd keep my vintage stuff because I love the pieces so much... But buying primarily from eBay or Etsy fosters that collecting habit even more than buying new from J. Press or O'Connell's, because they are truly one of a kind pieces these days...

On the other hand, I remember an old post from the An Affordable Wardrobe guy wear he talked about finding a thrifted Andover Shop jacket, selling it, regretting it, and then finding the same jacket he'd originally gotten rid of on eBay a couple years later, and buying it back... The same thing actually happened to Bill Frisell with a guitar...

I think one thing I keep in mind - and this speaks to stan's point - is I want to feel at home in my clothes, and while I'll always take very good care of them, I don't want to feel like they're on loan from a museum. I also want to feel like myself in them, not use them to create a Fantasy Berkeley_Breathes that will always feel like a costume version of myself.


"Always take your job seriously, never yourself." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

 

#9 2018-01-11 10:50:29

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: The Great White North
Posts: 1765

Re: The ideal wardrobe

stanshall wrote:

A double-breasted polo coat is a costume for a Gatsby fantasy, I'm looking at this one modern photo of a guy wearing one, with a patchwork tweed flat cap, and a black watch scarf, and a knit tie, and a tweed jacket, and flannels, and some kind of tan shoes, and he's smoking a pipe, while sitting on stone steps somewhere in NYC and it cracks me up, somebody's playing dress-up, and it seems silly to amass an unnecessarily large "comprehensive" wardrobe either to re-enact the golden age of Ivy or just to tick things off a list.

[...]

buy clothes that you actually need and that you'll wear, don't buy it all at once, don't obsess unnecessarily over any of it, and stay away from the dry cleaner.

This is all great, and I definitely want to read those further thoughts...

It's too bad "Ian Lawton" wasn't actually writing a dissertation on marketing and Ivy style or whatever it was he said he was doing, because it's very interesting... I think (and this is in no way a slam on Ivy Style) CC posts a lot of old ads and marketing there, so it makes sense that the fantasy version of Ivy would be his dominant view of it... Whereas here we love the old ads but we also love the yearbooks that show what people were actually doing... and we talk about the ways that the marketing and real life never matched up exactly, and the ways that it's a chicken and egg question of where the style actually came from... It's all fascinating to me.

We all are playing dress-up, of course, even (especially?) Billax... even Heavy Tweed Jacket... All clothes are dress-up, it's just whether or not you can forget that it's dress-up enough to just be yourself and have a great time living life or if the dress-up aspect takes over and becomes the whole point...


"Always take your job seriously, never yourself." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

 

#10 2018-01-11 12:02:16

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15981

Re: The ideal wardrobe

I've just been focusing on taking pleasure in wearing what I have recently.  I've parted with a lot of stuff over the past year that I really liked the idea of owning, but didn't wear.  Having a more manageable, more wearable, wardrobe is definitely something I've been working toward.  My closet and dresser got to the point where the options were just too many.  It was daunting to even look through everything and put together an outfit.  So I would typically forego that task and just ended up wearing the same few items in rotation all the time.  I still have too much, but I'm getting closer to a nice equilibrium.  But it's still damn hard to pass up certain items I come across.  That acquisition high can pull hard!


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

#11 2018-01-11 13:44:43

woofboxer
Devil's Ivy Advocate
From: Staines-upon-Thames, Middlesex
Posts: 6183

Re: The ideal wardrobe

stanshall wrote:

A double-breasted polo coat is a costume for a Gatsby fantasy,

Why do you think I want one ... old sport?


stanshall wrote:

I'm looking at this one modern photo of a guy wearing one, with a patchwork tweed flat cap, and a black watch scarf, and a knit tie, and a tweed jacket, and flannels, and some kind of tan shoes, and he's smoking a pipe, while sitting on stone steps somewhere in NYC and it cracks me up, somebody's playing dress-up, and it seems silly to amass an unnecessarily large "comprehensive" wardrobe either to re-enact the golden age of Ivy or just to tick things off a list.

Mmm ... I can hazard a guess who that might have been in the photo... haha!

Seriously, a polo coat is one of those items I always have a hankering for. I couldn't countenance the £1500+ that RL or Brooks ask for a new one, but when a good used one comes up eBay I always seem to veer away at the last moment. The truth is I already have a couple of really nice dress overcoats plus a ton of casual coats so it would be plain silly to get any more. I have been prone to to the tendency to 'get one of everything' in the past and I'm trying to stop doing it now. Apart from socks and underpants I could probably never buy another piece of clothing and be perfectly alright.

There are worse things to spend your money on though.


'I'm not that keen on the Average Look .......ever'. 
John Simons

 

#12 2018-01-11 14:11:23

Babbling Brooks
Member
Posts: 326

Re: The ideal wardrobe

I think Ivy sucumbs to this idea of average being attractive ...and is probably the driving force behind its longevity, and i dont mean its attractiveness in trying to bag a mate, I mean its reason for being so attractive in terms or proportion etc. to the eye, its avoidance of extremes etc.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Averageness


Dirty bucks I want you, dirty bucks I need you, woh-oh.

 

#13 2018-01-11 14:30:31

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: The Great White North
Posts: 1765

Re: The ideal wardrobe

woofboxer wrote:

Seriously, a polo coat is one of those items I always have a hankering for. I couldn't countenance the £1500+ that RL or Brooks ask for a new one, but when a good used one comes up eBay I always seem to veer away at the last moment.

I agree, woof, I love a polo coat... Prince Charles has an especially beautiful example.

I think the reason I personally latched onto the polo coat as an indicator of a certain kind of fantasy Ivy is the way it's treated by CC, commenter "Mike" and others as an Ivy essential. That's why I liked the original comment on Ivy Style by S.E. so much - he says, yes, we can love all the bells and whistles, but for someone *just starting out building a wardrobe,* it's better to start with the basics, and it's also nice to be reminded that the bells and whistles are just that, and that we CAN go a long way with just the core basics of the look... Similar to what WM said above about his core rotation.

EDIT: Just to be clear - and I've been saying this all long - no slam on CC or Ivy Style. We all come at this from different angles... Thanks everyone for not turning this into a dogpile thread


"Always take your job seriously, never yourself." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

 

#14 2018-01-11 14:31:40

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: The Great White North
Posts: 1765

Re: The ideal wardrobe

Babbling Brooks wrote:

I think Ivy sucumbs to this idea of average being attractive ...and is probably the driving force behind its longevity, and i dont mean its attractiveness in trying to bag a mate, I mean its reason for being so attractive in terms or proportion etc. to the eye, its avoidance of extremes etc.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Averageness

I really like this idea, especially after looking through old yearbooks for a couple of days... Thanks for bringing this up, Babbling...


"Always take your job seriously, never yourself." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

 

#15 2018-01-11 14:42:10

Babbling Brooks
Member
Posts: 326

Re: The ideal wardrobe

Id call it the polio coat


Dirty bucks I want you, dirty bucks I need you, woh-oh.

 

#16 2018-01-11 15:27:34

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: The Great White North
Posts: 1765

Re: The ideal wardrobe

One more thing to throw into the mix... Let's say your (and by your I mean my) ideal, very basic starter Ivy wardrobe is:

a suit, most likely gray
a 3/2 navy blazer
a brown and a gray tweed jacket
a tropical jacket of some kind (I'd recommend seersucker)
basic OCBDs (blue, white, pink, blue uni stripe, yellow if you're feeling frisky)
some kind of summer shirt options, probably - madras, seersucker, OCBD...
gray flannels
corduroys or lined chinos or something for winter
chino shorts, or madras if again you're feeling friskayyyy
chinos/khakis/whatever
a surcingle belt, maybe in navy
Wigwam El-Pine, Wigwam 625 and some nice OTC dress socks
Weejuns, burgundy or black longwing or a blucher, and Bean boots
a raincoat with a zip-in liner
2 sweaters, one v-neck and one Shetland
probably like 7 ties to start with, a couple each of foulard/repp/emblematic

It's not perfect, but it's basic. Now, you can buy a new navy blazer from J. Press for about, what, $550? And about that much for most basic sport coats at O'Cs? So if we have John Doe looking to become Joe Ivy, do we tell him to go to O'Cs, or to spend $40 on eBay? Is one better? Are they even different, aside from the cost? (And I don't mean specs, I mean in experience, or something).

I saw an ooooold comment from CC somewhere else on Ivy Style that mentioned brand new college kids not being told a certain item or brand to buy, but rather the shop to go to - then the shop could outfit you from head to toe with new stuff and you'd be good to go. My guess would be that if you asked CC where the best place to buy a 3/2 blazer was, he'd tell you J. Press.

https://media.giphy.com/media/26gspjl5bxzhSdJtK/giphy.gif

It's just his way of doing things. But even if money was no object, I personally would tell John Doe to hit up eBay and see what's happenin' over there first. There's a very concise way to sum all of this up that's eluding me right now... but it has something to do with all of what we've been talking about. Maybe someone else will be able to help me out.


"Always take your job seriously, never yourself." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

 

#17 2018-01-11 15:33:07

Babbling Brooks
Member
Posts: 326

Re: The ideal wardrobe

Im sure weve done this a thousand times before on a few threads, ive never got bored of it though!

The el-pine is finally avaible in the UK via amazon global

Last edited by Babbling Brooks (2018-01-11 15:34:26)


Dirty bucks I want you, dirty bucks I need you, woh-oh.

 

#18 2018-01-11 15:38:06

Babbling Brooks
Member
Posts: 326

Re: The ideal wardrobe

Trouble with ebay when youre starting out on sports jackets etc is fit, if you go somewhere and they do alterations its probably better in the long run, you normally have to kiss a few frogs when it comes to jackets,, problem would be finding a kosher seller of ivy kit.


Dirty bucks I want you, dirty bucks I need you, woh-oh.

 

#19 2018-01-12 03:36:10

woofboxer
Devil's Ivy Advocate
From: Staines-upon-Thames, Middlesex
Posts: 6183

Re: The ideal wardrobe

Berkeley_Breathes wrote:

I saw an ooooold comment from CC somewhere else on Ivy Style that mentioned brand new college kids not being told a certain item or brand to buy, but rather the shop to go to - then the shop could outfit you from head to toe with new stuff and you'd be good to go. My guess would be that if you asked CC where the best place to buy a 3/2 blazer was, he'd tell you J. Press.


It's just his way of doing things. But even if money was no object, I personally would tell John Doe to hit up eBay and see what's happenin' over there first. There's a very concise way to sum all of this up that's eluding me right now... but it has something to do with all of what we've been talking about. Maybe someone else will be able to help me out.

EBay/vintage wins out on the grounds of cost effectiveness and authenticity. It would still be possible to get your starter wardrobe from J Press, or better still, O'Connells if you had the spending power. You might struggle at Brooks, even if you had the cash!

Someone has commented recently, either in this thread or elsewhere that the guys in the old college pics didn't obsess over the clothes, they just wore them effortlessly. Well of course part of that is that a lot of the clothes were bought at outfitters where someone, who knew what they were doing, served you, steered you away from stuff that ddidn't look right and made sure that any alterations required were done. So when you walked out you had stuff that suited you and fitted and, as we know, that is half the battle.

As Babbling observes, there is a learning curve for buying from eBay and eventually the number of misbuys drops. But you stumble around for a while before you establish what works for you.


'I'm not that keen on the Average Look .......ever'. 
John Simons

 

#20 2018-01-12 07:38:47

mhalat
Member
Posts: 74

Re: The ideal wardrobe

Babbling Brooks wrote:

Trouble with ebay when youre starting out on sports jackets etc is fit, if you go somewhere and they do alterations its probably better in the long run, you normally have to kiss a few frogs when it comes to jackets,, problem would be finding a kosher seller of ivy kit.

Agreed - I bought a J. Press suit on sale online in the summer, and by the time my tailor was done with it, its price had doubled. I don't mind messing around with the odd shirt on ebay, or even casual slacks. But for businesswear, I really need the showroom experience - trying on, having a salesperson measure me for alterations, and so on. Ultimately would like to go bespoke, and start rounding out my wardrobe with some more English tailoring and shirts; but for now, I really need to be present in a retailer for OTR and MTM.

 

#21 2018-01-12 07:44:06

mhalat
Member
Posts: 74

Re: The ideal wardrobe

woofboxer wrote:

Someone has commented recently, either in this thread or elsewhere that the guys in the old college pics didn't obsess over the clothes, they just wore them effortlessly. Well of course part of that is that a lot of the clothes were bought at outfitters where someone, who knew what they were doing, served you, steered you away from stuff that ddidn't look right and made sure that any alterations required were done. So when you walked out you had stuff that suited you and fitted and, as we know, that is half the battle.

That'd be me, Woof! It's interesting that you mention that - one of the things that has pushed my clothing expenditures up is that it is very difficult to get the same service that my father did at M&S or The Hudson's Bay or Macy's or whatever when I was a child at those same stores. I used to sit around, very bored, but remember how attentive the sales staff were, to say nothing of how knowledgeable they were too. Nowadays, it seems that it's nearly impossible to find someone to ring you out, let alone measure you at these stores.

A side observation is that I actually have salesmen whose 'style' of measuring me (because there is a bit of art there, as well as science) is preferable to the point that I only trust them to do so.

 

#22 2018-01-12 07:51:50

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: The Great White North
Posts: 1765

Re: The ideal wardrobe

woofboxer wrote:

As Babbling observes, there is a learning curve for buying from eBay and eventually the number of misbuys drops. But you stumble around for a while before you establish what works for you.

Learning to ignore tagged sizes and just use measurements for sport coats is huge for this. As well as buying several shirts in your size from different makers to see the differences in collar and sleeve fit.

mhalat wrote:

Agreed - I bought a J. Press suit on sale online in the summer, and by the time my tailor was done with it, its price had doubled. I don't mind messing around with the odd shirt on ebay, or even casual slacks. But for businesswear, I really need the showroom experience

I believe woof has some beautiful vintage suits from eBay, and I'm sure WM has some too, but on my budget, buying vintage or off-size suits is just not a risk I'm willing to take, because of the work necessary to get the trousers to fit. In fact, I bought that Bunce Bros seersucker suit on eBay recently just for the jacket, knowing I'd never bother getting alterations done on the trousers. I'd rather have my suits MTM, with correct fit (including rise in the trousers) from the start. There are some companies that will give you a MTM 3/2 patch pocket suit with 12" trouser rise for half the price of a J. Press suit.


"Always take your job seriously, never yourself." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

 

#23 2018-01-12 08:09:16

mhalat
Member
Posts: 74

Re: The ideal wardrobe

Berkeley_Breathes wrote:

I'd rather have my suits MTM, with correct fit (including rise in the trousers) from the start. There are some companies that will give you a MTM 3/2 patch pocket suit with 12" trouser rise for half the price of a J. Press suit.

Interesting tangent - a lot of suppliers for J. Press, O'Connells, and so on, are Canadian - companies like S. Cohen, Samuelsohn, Coppley, and so on.....

I should do some looking into whether they would do the same for me...

 

#24 2018-01-12 08:50:00

Babbling Brooks
Member
Posts: 326

Re: The ideal wardrobe

mhalat wrote:

Babbling Brooks wrote:

Trouble with ebay when youre starting out on sports jackets etc is fit, if you go somewhere and they do alterations its probably better in the long run, you normally have to kiss a few frogs when it comes to jackets,, problem would be finding a kosher seller of ivy kit.

Agreed - I bought a J. Press suit on sale online in the summer, and by the time my tailor was done with it, its price had doubled. I don't mind messing around with the odd shirt on ebay, or even casual slacks. But for businesswear, I really need the showroom experience - trying on, having a salesperson measure me for alterations, and so on. Ultimately would like to go bespoke, and start rounding out my wardrobe with some more English tailoring and shirts; but for now, I really need to be present in a retailer for OTR and MTM.

Suit jackets and sports jackets can be a complete arse really. I think ive probably got two jackets im 100 percent happy with...


Dirty bucks I want you, dirty bucks I need you, woh-oh.

 

#25 2018-01-12 10:04:10

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15981

Re: The ideal wardrobe

Berkeley_Breathes wrote:

Babbling Brooks wrote:

I think Ivy sucumbs to this idea of average being attractive ...and is probably the driving force behind its longevity, and i dont mean its attractiveness in trying to bag a mate, I mean its reason for being so attractive in terms or proportion etc. to the eye, its avoidance of extremes etc.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Averageness

I really like this idea, especially after looking through old yearbooks for a couple of days... Thanks for bringing this up, Babbling...

But what was average in 1960 ain't what's average today.  I've received flack from friends for tucking my shirt in when I'm in casual attire.


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

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