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#1 2010-01-30 09:54:52

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 8996

English vs. American color perception

What is interesting about the English is their color perception. A shirt which has only a little brown or green in it can often become a "Brown" or "Green" shirt. For an average American, a shirt would need to have a predominance of those colors to qualify. Same holds for ties ad suits. A very little brown in the silk makes it a country tie!


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#2 2010-01-30 14:26:19

Big Tony
Member
Posts: 5478

Re: English vs. American color perception

Regarding footwear: you can get burgundy everywhere in North America, but it's rare in the UK. It doesn't even seem to be on the radar in the UK. In reverse, you can easily find tan/tobacco in the UK, but harder in N. America.


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#3 2010-01-30 15:22:50

formby
Member
From: Wiseacre
Posts: 8359

Re: English vs. American color perception

Big Tony wrote:

Regarding footwear: you can get burgundy everywhere in North America, but it's rare in the UK. It doesn't even seem to be on the radar in the UK. In reverse, you can easily find tan/tobacco in the UK, but harder in N. America.

Burgundy coloured leather? Sounds nasty.


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#4 2010-01-31 17:04:03

Sam Hober
Member
From: Bangkok
Posts: 170

Re: English vs. American color perception

Film Noir Buff wrote:

What is interesting about the English is their color perception. A shirt which has only a little brown or green in it can often become a "Brown" or "Green" shirt. For an average American, a shirt would need to have a predominance of those colors to qualify. Same holds for ties ad suits. A very little brown in the silk makes it a country tie!

A very interesting observation.

I wonder why?

And what do the French and Italians think?


David Hober
"Sam" is Samantha my daughter
Custom Made / Bespoke Ties
www.samhober.com

 

#5 2010-01-31 19:26:30

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 8996

Re: English vs. American color perception

Sam Hober wrote:

Film Noir Buff wrote:

What is interesting about the English is their color perception. A shirt which has only a little brown or green in it can often become a "Brown" or "Green" shirt. For an average American, a shirt would need to have a predominance of those colors to qualify. Same holds for ties ad suits. A very little brown in the silk makes it a country tie!

A very interesting observation.

I wonder why?

And what do the French and Italians think?

I only have a few observations on the English approach to color. I dont think they get exposed to the numerous shades of color that people in some other countries get introduced to. Pink is pink, blue is blue, purple is purple. If a shade goes wrong, it just wont sell, which means you have to intuitively know what colors the English like. I think also they have strong color assignments; it could be a reflection of their complete separation between town and country.

What is more interesting is that there are exceptions such as Acorn's keswick NF-Pink which has sort of an apricot stripe in it and a brown but I suppose the blues and pinks offset it.

What is also interesting are some ties which i would think because of their pattern and material would be too fancy for country are considered just that because a very little brown evident in the pattern. Ironically, another tie which has a little brown in it may be alright for city wear.

Which might answer my own problem above of why a "brown" shirt with just a little brown in it can still be city. It isnt inconsistency as much as first reactions. If the English observer is most likely to see pink first, it's pink even if there is brown or green in the pattern.  This suggests that the art resides in how a pattern is set or arranged and that the English see many shades without being able to articulate them. I have seen ties which are almost all grey with just a little red, called red ties by the English.


The Italians see colors much better but are so artistic with them that there is no cultural consistency; instead there is a never ending search for variety and beauty in tinctural execution.


I think the French and Italians admire the English look.


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#6 2010-02-01 00:32:25

Sam Hober
Member
From: Bangkok
Posts: 170

Re: English vs. American color perception

"....If the English observer is most likely to see pink first, it's pink even if there is brown or green in the pattern... "

That says quite a bit.

Next, why would an Englishman tend to see "XYZ" first?

A possible answer is that they have lots of classic color combinations and patterns and expect that if they see "X" it is "XYZ" Note no special meaning with my letters I am just speculating that they are used to certain color combinations and sometimes see what they think is there.

This holds true in other areas of life:

When I get into a taxi in Bangkok and give directions in Thai drivers from the countryside with little education typically need for me to repeat my directions half a dozen times they assume that I can't speak Thai.

While drivers that grew up in Bangkok with a bit more education and sophistication will understand me right away.

The point being that the drivers born in the countryside expect that I can't speak Thai and react accordingly while the Bangkok born drivers have a different background and expect that an American expat does speak Thai.

Speaking of backgrounds I wonder if well educated British see colors the same as those who have less education?

Maybe yes, maybe no as all classes probably have equal access to the mass media.


David Hober
"Sam" is Samantha my daughter
Custom Made / Bespoke Ties
www.samhober.com

 

#7 2010-02-01 01:32:21

Bishop of Briggs
Member
Posts: 3948

Re: English vs. American color perception

formby wrote:

Big Tony wrote:

Regarding footwear: you can get burgundy everywhere in North America, but it's rare in the UK. It doesn't even seem to be on the radar in the UK. In reverse, you can easily find tan/tobacco in the UK, but harder in N. America.

Burgundy coloured leather? Sounds nasty.

My Crockett & Jones burgundy loafer - http://www.shoes.shoppingsection.co.uk/ … ory_Code=. Not nasty at all!

Last edited by Bishop of Briggs (2010-02-01 01:33:17)


Contrary to lies of FNB and Woofboxer, I (and most of the other "Buff Bastards") have been banned from posting on this forum. There are only a few posters left so don't waste your time on here. This forum is now dead!

 

#8 2010-02-01 01:47:19

Kingstonian
Member
From: sea to shining sea
Posts: 3205

Re: English vs. American color perception

British approach to colour is a reflection of the landscape of these isles.

Black immigrants in 1950s used to favour very loud and bold colours that jarred. Once they were here a generation they started to tone it down.

 

#9 2010-02-01 01:54:09

Bishop of Briggs
Member
Posts: 3948

Re: English vs. American color perception

Film Noir Buff wrote:

Sam Hober wrote:

Film Noir Buff wrote:

What is interesting about the English is their color perception. A shirt which has only a little brown or green in it can often become a "Brown" or "Green" shirt. For an average American, a shirt would need to have a predominance of those colors to qualify. Same holds for ties ad suits. A very little brown in the silk makes it a country tie!

A very interesting observation.

I wonder why?

And what do the French and Italians think?

I only have a few observations on the English approach to color. I dont think they get exposed to the numerous shades of color that people in some other countries get introduced to. Pink is pink, blue is blue, purple is purple. If a shade goes wrong, it just wont sell, which means you have to intuitively know what colors the English like. I think also they have strong color assignments; it could be a reflection of their complete separation between town and country.

What is more interesting is that there are exceptions such as Acorn's keswick NF-Pink which has sort of an apricot stripe in it and a brown but I suppose the blues and pinks offset it.

What is also interesting are some ties which i would think because of their pattern and material would be too fancy for country are considered just that because a very little brown evident in the pattern. Ironically, another tie which has a little brown in it may be alright for city wear.

Which might answer my own problem above of why a "brown" shirt with just a little brown in it can still be city. It isnt inconsistency as much as first reactions. If the English observer is most likely to see pink first, it's pink even if there is brown or green in the pattern.  This suggests that the art resides in how a pattern is set or arranged and that the English see many shades without being able to articulate them. I have seen ties which are almost all grey with just a little red, called red ties by the English.


The Italians see colors much better but are so artistic with them that there is no cultural consistency; instead there is a never ending search for variety and beauty in tinctural execution.


I think the French and Italians admire the English look.

I have to disagree, especially in relation to London. Turnbull & Asser, TM Lewin and Duchamp sell a lot multi-coloured shirts and ties (and not just in Jermyn Street). The City, and business, tend to be more conservative - striped and solid shirts with lots of blue, purple and maroon ties. Pink is currently unfashionable. Ties are rarely worn in the advertising, PR and internet sectors.

Brown and green are mainly restricted to countrywear. Over the last 20 years, countrywear sales slumped in Britain and only a few brands have survived. Even in country towns, black, grey and blue (especially jeans) dominate. Barbour has enjoyed a renaissance recently but nylon brands like Berghaus dominate. Even in Kingston, we have thriving Blacks, Millets and Cotswold shops


Contrary to lies of FNB and Woofboxer, I (and most of the other "Buff Bastards") have been banned from posting on this forum. There are only a few posters left so don't waste your time on here. This forum is now dead!

 

#10 2010-02-01 06:52:37

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 8996

Re: English vs. American color perception

Bishop of Briggs wrote:

Film Noir Buff wrote:

Sam Hober wrote:


A very interesting observation.

I wonder why?

And what do the French and Italians think?

I only have a few observations on the English approach to color. I dont think they get exposed to the numerous shades of color that people in some other countries get introduced to. Pink is pink, blue is blue, purple is purple. If a shade goes wrong, it just wont sell, which means you have to intuitively know what colors the English like. I think also they have strong color assignments; it could be a reflection of their complete separation between town and country.

What is more interesting is that there are exceptions such as Acorn's keswick NF-Pink which has sort of an apricot stripe in it and a brown but I suppose the blues and pinks offset it.

What is also interesting are some ties which i would think because of their pattern and material would be too fancy for country are considered just that because a very little brown evident in the pattern. Ironically, another tie which has a little brown in it may be alright for city wear.

Which might answer my own problem above of why a "brown" shirt with just a little brown in it can still be city. It isnt inconsistency as much as first reactions. If the English observer is most likely to see pink first, it's pink even if there is brown or green in the pattern.  This suggests that the art resides in how a pattern is set or arranged and that the English see many shades without being able to articulate them. I have seen ties which are almost all grey with just a little red, called red ties by the English.


The Italians see colors much better but are so artistic with them that there is no cultural consistency; instead there is a never ending search for variety and beauty in tinctural execution.


I think the French and Italians admire the English look.

I have to disagree, especially in relation to London. Turnbull & Asser, TM Lewin and Duchamp sell a lot multi-coloured shirts and ties (and not just in Jermyn Street). The City, and business, tend to be more conservative - striped and solid shirts with lots of blue, purple and maroon ties. Pink is currently unfashionable. Ties are rarely worn in the advertising, PR and internet sectors.

Brown and green are mainly restricted to countrywear. Over the last 20 years, countrywear sales slumped in Britain and only a few brands have survived. Even in country towns, black, grey and blue (especially jeans) dominate. Barbour has enjoyed a renaissance recently but nylon brands like Berghaus dominate. Even in Kingston, we have thriving Blacks, Millets and Cotswold shops

What part are we disagreeing on?


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#11 2010-02-01 12:46:32

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14316

Re: English vs. American color perception

All very interesting perspectives from FNB and the Bishop. 

The Italians are especially into the English look, particulary within their own borders and selling to fellow Italians.

When I first started working back in '87 in the engineering construction industry, the distinctions between town and country where evident very much in the workplace. Where I worked, the head office chaps always wore dark grey, or dark suits and plain shirts and very conservative ties.  The only people who wore cufflinks were the accountants or financial people, they were also the only ones who wore bold or pink/purple colours. Even now, I always feel somewhat out of place if I wear French cuffs to work, as if I am operating outside a social norm. Which is a shame, because I have some decent cuffs from the likes of Duchamp.  I also find myself making negative judgements on those who wear cufflinks in business meetings who are not in financial disciplines, or who are sporting rather ostentatious shirts who are not an accountant.

The project managers at site offices, to a man, always wore tweeds and brown shoes. They would never wear black shoes, always brown and brown suits, but mainly jackets. Green was permitted.  They were also the only ones who would occassionally sport a button down. Their ties were generally country golds, or similar.  They always seemed on the verge of being off to some small race course like Bangor on Dee, or seducing some local bar maid with the project's 'float' money.

Of course, the above sartorial culture is dead now. Its very few companies where such unwritten dress codes linger on.


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#12 2010-02-01 15:20:33

Bishop of Briggs
Member
Posts: 3948

Re: English vs. American color perception

Film Noir Buff wrote:

Bishop of Briggs wrote:

Film Noir Buff wrote:


I only have a few observations on the English approach to color. I dont think they get exposed to the numerous shades of color that people in some other countries get introduced to. Pink is pink, blue is blue, purple is purple. If a shade goes wrong, it just wont sell, which means you have to intuitively know what colors the English like. I think also they have strong color assignments; it could be a reflection of their complete separation between town and country.

What is more interesting is that there are exceptions such as Acorn's keswick NF-Pink which has sort of an apricot stripe in it and a brown but I suppose the blues and pinks offset it.

What is also interesting are some ties which i would think because of their pattern and material would be too fancy for country are considered just that because a very little brown evident in the pattern. Ironically, another tie which has a little brown in it may be alright for city wear.

Which might answer my own problem above of why a "brown" shirt with just a little brown in it can still be city. It isnt inconsistency as much as first reactions. If the English observer is most likely to see pink first, it's pink even if there is brown or green in the pattern.  This suggests that the art resides in how a pattern is set or arranged and that the English see many shades without being able to articulate them. I have seen ties which are almost all grey with just a little red, called red ties by the English.


The Italians see colors much better but are so artistic with them that there is no cultural consistency; instead there is a never ending search for variety and beauty in tinctural execution.


I think the French and Italians admire the English look.

I have to disagree, especially in relation to London. Turnbull & Asser, TM Lewin and Duchamp sell a lot multi-coloured shirts and ties (and not just in Jermyn Street). The City, and business, tend to be more conservative - striped and solid shirts with lots of blue, purple and maroon ties. Pink is currently unfashionable. Ties are rarely worn in the advertising, PR and internet sectors.

Brown and green are mainly restricted to countrywear. Over the last 20 years, countrywear sales slumped in Britain and only a few brands have survived. Even in country towns, black, grey and blue (especially jeans) dominate. Barbour has enjoyed a renaissance recently but nylon brands like Berghaus dominate. Even in Kingston, we have thriving Blacks, Millets and Cotswold shops

What part are we disagreeing on?

English approach to colour, and the rest of the related paragraph, or perhaps I misinterpreted your comments.


Contrary to lies of FNB and Woofboxer, I (and most of the other "Buff Bastards") have been banned from posting on this forum. There are only a few posters left so don't waste your time on here. This forum is now dead!

 

#13 2010-02-01 15:30:53

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 8996

Re: English vs. American color perception

Bishop of Briggs wrote:

Film Noir Buff wrote:

Bishop of Briggs wrote:

I have to disagree, especially in relation to London. Turnbull & Asser, TM Lewin and Duchamp sell a lot multi-coloured shirts and ties (and not just in Jermyn Street). The City, and business, tend to be more conservative - striped and solid shirts with lots of blue, purple and maroon ties. Pink is currently unfashionable. Ties are rarely worn in the advertising, PR and internet sectors.

Brown and green are mainly restricted to countrywear. Over the last 20 years, countrywear sales slumped in Britain and only a few brands have survived. Even in country towns, black, grey and blue (especially jeans) dominate. Barbour has enjoyed a renaissance recently but nylon brands like Berghaus dominate. Even in Kingston, we have thriving Blacks, Millets and Cotswold shops

What part are we disagreeing on?

English approach to colour, and the rest of the related paragraph, or perhaps I misinterpreted your comments.

I dont presume that I am an expert about English approaches to color. I am simply giving my thoughts on why they would react or categorize certain colors one way that another culture would not necessarily do, or even notice. I dont see how you could disagree with what I said without substituting some alternative information. The bit on color that you did include seems to be in accord with what I said.


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#14 2010-02-02 13:24:38

Grossgrain Silk
Member
From: The Inner Bar
Posts: 877

Re: English vs. American color perception

I think it starts from the shoes. Black is the only acceptable colour in town at work, unless you are in a 'new' industry. If you have black shoes then country tints of green and brown (bottle green in a tie is fine as it goes nicely with charcoal) are a problem. It isn't the pattern or the number of colours - it is specific colours themselves.

The bigger the garment the greater the difficulty. Brown suit - unthinkable. Brown shirt - non-u. Brown tie - probably not. A tiny bit of brown is just about acceptable.

Conversely, and unlike the States, any colour that is good with grey and navy blue is fine (except brown). Pink, red, purple, maroon, bright blue are all ok. And, because the suit is going to be striped, plain or discreetly patterned, the bolder shirts and ties are also ok.

So, a comment about colour becomes a comment about what might make the garment unsuitable for wear.

In the country it should camouflage you when you lie down in a ditch.

 

#15 2010-02-04 22:47:25

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 8996

Re: English vs. American color perception

Grossgrain Silk wrote:

I think it starts from the shoes. Black is the only acceptable colour in town at work, unless you are in a 'new' industry. If you have black shoes then country tints of green and brown (bottle green in a tie is fine as it goes nicely with charcoal) are a problem. It isn't the pattern or the number of colours - it is specific colours themselves.

The bigger the garment the greater the difficulty. Brown suit - unthinkable. Brown shirt - non-u. Brown tie - probably not. A tiny bit of brown is just about acceptable.

Conversely, and unlike the States, <i>any</i> colour that is good with grey and navy blue is fine (except brown). Pink, red, purple, maroon, bright blue are all ok. And, because the suit is going to be striped, plain or discreetly patterned, the bolder shirts and ties are also ok.

So, a comment about colour becomes a comment about what might make the garment unsuitable for wear.

In the country it should camouflage you when you lie down in a ditch.

I think also the inclusion/exclusion factors play a role. The English tend to exclude things until they prove themselves. The Americans try to include things. For an American, there is strength in numbers or variety is the spice of life, for the English exclusivity makes one unique and admired, not alone. A good example is fresco cloth. Used by the English for blazers, some Americans have decided because it's useful to combat heat/humidity that it must also work as a suit maybe even an overcoat. For the English, it will remain as a blazer with no need to find further uses for it.


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#16 2010-04-27 21:34:07

ckav
Member
Posts: 315

Re: English vs. American color perception

We can see colour through english eye's beyond clothing. An early passion was english cars. My first, a MGA coupe was sprayed in british racing green. A school friend's uncle  was a Jaguar Le Mans raceworks mechanic. My brother copycatted with a roadster sporting a shaved head for greater compression and a early Austin Powers union jack that broke 4 crankshafts. 'Uncle' Nigel was heaven sent for syncronising SU carbs ( my brother slapping on oversized Webers) and coming up with treasures like 5 point H pattern racing harness  and close ratio gear sets for hill climbs. He also steadfatly refused to drive  or sit as passenger in my brother's ragtop, always slipping into mine and revealing arcane insights into double clutching non synchro gearboxes, breaking the rear end on Mullholland Drive and most important the joys of simply letting the engine work efficiently at the proper RPM and gear and enjoying the scenery. Nigel's niece finally told me years later why I was so favoured 'You resprayed your car a proper colour.'
My car's ancestors, carriages with formal livery, trade  and farm tell a similar story.
And if you want to spot someone facing disaster, paint 54MM lead miniatures and notice your competition's  officer sporting ruby red collar tabs instead of british scarlet.

Last edited by ckav (2010-04-27 21:36:02)

 

#17 2010-04-28 04:43:50

Kingstonian
Member
From: sea to shining sea
Posts: 3205

Re: English vs. American color perception

Nobody has mentioned British tendency to sometimes go for deliberately ugly colours. Drab tattersalls, Harrods sludge green etc.. Italians, for instance, would tend to go for something a lot sharper.

However, because it is easily identifiable as British it becomes a fad for those who want to copy a British look. Hence the popularity of crappy Barbours and puffa jackets.

 

#18 2010-04-28 09:02:15

Jeeves
The Gentleman's Gentleman
Posts: 420

Re: English vs. American color perception

Kingstonian wrote:

Nobody has mentioned British tendency to sometimes go for deliberately ugly colours. Drab tattersalls, Harrods sludge green etc.. Italians, for instance, would tend to go for something a lot sharper.

I think there is a tendency to go all or nothing rather than to compromise on the middle ground. For example if you aren't going to wear a muted tie then don't mess around, go for something bright like Duchamp.

 

#19 2010-04-28 09:08:44

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 8996

Re: English vs. American color perception

Kingstonian wrote:

Nobody has mentioned British tendency to sometimes go for deliberately ugly colours. Drab tattersalls, Harrods sludge green etc.. Italians, for instance, would tend to go for something a lot sharper.

However, because it is easily identifiable as British it becomes a fad for those who want to copy a British look. Hence the popularity of crappy Barbours and puffa jackets.

I know that the English have very restricted color rules that other Western jacket and tie cultures do not have. For instance, they wont wear certain shirt colors with a black jacket. Maybe it is because they consider the black jacket a statement unto itself which demands certain color (or lack of color) accessories.

In the USA, we have fewer color taboos but there is the aversion to pink outside of the most comfortable upper middle class circles. Lilac is almost universally shunned by men. I have never figured out why but it elicits a worse response than pink. It does depend how the color is used with Americans because you can wear certain lilac stripes on a white background or intermittently mixed with other stripes. Generally it is a lilac ground color that gets the reactions started.

Americans love red patterns on shirts; bright, medium and dark red on a white or blue background. They love combinations of red/white/blue too.

They like red ties a lot and yellow patterns on a red tie attract them. In fact, so do gold and mustard on red; this combination repels the English.


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#20 2010-04-28 10:08:57

Big Tony
Member
Posts: 5478

Re: English vs. American color perception

Film Noir Buff wrote:

Americans love red patterns on shirts; bright, medium and dark red on a white or blue background. They love combinations of red/white/blue too.

They like red ties a lot and yellow patterns on a red tie attract them. In fact, so do gold and mustard on red; this combination repels the English.

I admit I am strongly attracted to primary colours, especially when used together. Red, yellow (gold), blue, and with white as a base (such as a shirt) is a splendid mix if executed well. Bold contrasts are part of this.

Too many patterns, too many pantone shades, might be good fun for well-known published fashion gurus and Savile Row customers, but seem to me to be too calculated to be relaxed, no matter how relaxed the wearer might be. I always think: "And how long did that take to put together..."

In my opinion.

Last edited by Big Tony (2010-04-28 10:10:33)


"What sort of post-apocalyptic deathscape is this?"
"I don't want to look like a cock hungry sailor after all !!!"
"When it comes to infidelity, broken families, and reckless fatherhood, the underclass are amateurs."

 

#21 2010-04-28 10:16:03

Kingstonian
Member
From: sea to shining sea
Posts: 3205

Re: English vs. American color perception

Film Noir Buff wrote:

They like red ties a lot and yellow patterns on a red tie attract them. In fact, so do gold and mustard on red; this combination repels the English.

No it does not.

 

#22 2010-04-28 12:55:37

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14316

Re: English vs. American color perception

English Tory-toffs often sport blue shirts and ties with yellow patterns.

Gold, mustard on red would repel anyone. Only the minds of Duchamp could come up with such a monstrosity.

Last edited by 4F Hepcat (2010-04-28 12:56:52)


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#23 2010-04-28 14:44:19

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 8996

Re: English vs. American color perception

Further, English color prejudices seem almost child like in their stubbornness. My opinion is that the English refuse to wear colors that violate their color taboos. Americans will wear a lilac shirt if it is discounted enough.


Le costume fait sur mesure en tissue Fresco est le préféré des ploucs!
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#24 2010-04-29 12:50:53

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14316

Re: English vs. American color perception

I don't know about that, there's plenty of English walking around with lilac shirts, and by lilac, I mean that very light pinkish colour. I've certainly owned one Gieves & Hawkes shirt of that type many moons ago. In fact I stand corrected, I've one in my wardrobe.

I think maybe English who work in the City are restrained and castrated by such colour rules, reinforced from their buggering school days at top public schools. Outside of such gilded walls, there is more freedom and less colour prejudice in clothes.

However, I certainly would never wear a pinstripe suit for work - outside of banking or accountancy, would be fraudulant in my opinion. Black shoes I never wear when visiting a supplier, I always go for brown shoes, just to let them know that I consider this a jolly out and that they are not worthy of the formal respect of a black oxford or gibson.

Its interesting watching all the politicians in the run up to the British elections, all the same, all sartorially vacant, no style or substance, most definitely signifying nothing.


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#25 2010-04-29 13:33:21

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 8996

Re: English vs. American color perception

4F Hepcat wrote:

I don't know about that, there's plenty of English walking around with lilac shirts, and by lilac, I mean that very light pinkish colour. I've certainly owned one Gieves & Hawkes shirt of that type many moons ago. In fact I stand corrected, I've one in my wardrobe.

I think maybe English who work in the City are restrained and castrated by such colour rules, reinforced from their buggering school days at top public schools. Outside of such gilded walls, there is more freedom and less colour prejudice in clothes.

However, I certainly would never wear a pinstripe suit for work - outside of banking or accountancy, would be fraudulant in my opinion. Black shoes I never wear when visiting a supplier, I always go for brown shoes, just to let them know that I consider this a jolly out and that they are not worthy of the formal respect of a black oxford or gibson.

Its interesting watching all the politicians in the run up to the British elections, all the same, all sartorially vacant, no style or substance, most definitely signifying nothing.

It's Americans that avoid lilac, not the English. I think the English like lilac. I was saying that when the English do dislike a color, ou cant get it on their backs if you give it to them for free, whereas, the Americans will wear just about anything if the price is right.

I dont really care about what the English wear outside of The City, frankly when they aren't following strict codes, they're somewhat lost.


Le costume fait sur mesure en tissue Fresco est le préféré des ploucs!
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