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#1 2017-09-09 00:54:38

The_Shooman
A pretty face
From: AUSTRALIA
Posts: 12926

wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

As we know, L.V is almost like a mall brand now, oh so common. "In China, Louis Vuitton is seen as the brand that even your ai-yi, or domestic helper, can afford,". Those really in the know now shop for Hermes' because they know it is well above what the masses can afford.
https://www.cnbc.com/id/47723719

To me the LV status symbol is no longer. It is so massed produced and over exposed now. I like the quote "LV sell bad bags that make people poor".

Dana Thomas - Deluxe: How Luxury Lost its Lustre
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmAlmNjIhew

So many suckers around these days....people with no real status wearing perceived status symbols long past the time when it used to mean something, and such common folk not knowing quality and status if it bit them on the backside.


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#2 2017-09-09 10:59:32

Film Noir Buff
Dandy Nightmare
From: Devil's Island
Posts: 9072

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

Fashion does revolve around status and even perceived status. And in the subset of fashion there is the category "Luxury". luxury, implies you have a seat at the table, that youre a member. it isnt something to get irritated by, it's what separates the civilized from the uncivilized. Luxury replaces baser, grimier instincts. It may be that the pursuit of luxury is a bad byproduct of a more refined ideal but it helps people to channel aggression which go against peaceful coexistence in city settings. 

It is true when a luxury brand becomes overexposed and too attainable, it loses caste and becomes an overpriced commodity. At this point, there is a grey area before the market catches up with the loophole of oversupply. Once that loophole is closed, a new luxury brand steps in to replace the old, discarded one.


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#3 2017-09-10 06:16:10

Kingston1an
Member
Posts: 3413

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

All cufflinks love brands. It is just a question of the brand maintaining its status for them. Knockoffs can kill a brands image.

You only have to look at the queues in the London sales. Chinese cannot get enough of upmarket brands. They don't do understated.


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#4 2017-09-11 00:16:23

The_Shooman
A pretty face
From: AUSTRALIA
Posts: 12926

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

Kingston1an wrote:

You only have to look at the queues in the London sales. Chinese cannot get enough of upmarket brands. They don't do understated.

Yes, the Chinese are right into brands. I went to Harrolds (most exclusive shop in Oz) and there was a long line of Chinese teens and 20 somethings. No aussies in sight. Those kids love the Thom Brown and Balmain and all those brands, it establishes their status.

Here are some interesting quotes from the asians at purse forum about brands and status.

Brands and status - one-upmanship, trying to prove you are the best
QUOTE 1
"i'm asian as well and personally, i think it has to do with group
mentality. asians for the most part love brand names and use it as a
status symbol and a way to show off to their peers. and those who aren't
necessarily upper-class like to buy LV, gucci, etc. in order to emulate
the upper class.. to feel like they belong as well.

it's like asians and their kids.. oh look.. my son is going to be an
lawyer. oh yeah? well mine is going to be a doctor. they're always
trying to one-up each other! LOL"

QUOTE 2
"Asians (trying not to generalize too much here, but "asians" as in me,
my family, and every other asian person I know or know of) love
competing in everything, key=competition. Not only for designer labels,
wealth, superficial stuff, but also the positive things like
intelligence, grades, academic excellence, who works harder...etc"

"starting at a very young age kids want to be the best and have the best
of everything. Furthermore, my family at least rewards me with material
items for certain achievements"

QUOTE 3
"I agree with everyone else that its a "show off" thing. Asians like to
show off....now dont throw stones at me. Not all asians. But a majority
of them do like to show off"

QUOTE 4
"1) It's been ingrained in me, with my parents' and their friends'
CONSTANT need to one up one another....2) My own need to somehow "prove"
that I'm successful, which ties into the whole Asian-on-Asian
one-upmanship"

QUOTE 5
"Being asian myself, i think its more or less that we want the best of
everything and to flaunt it! Also agree as being competitive with other
asians(people in general)"

QUOTE 6
"Naturally, many Asians are flashy or at least it is more common to be
seen in the best cars, nicest clothes etc whereby everything has a label
to it"


000---

A young bloke proves he's the top of the heap by firmly establishing his street cred as the king! Spends $1,000,000 on streetwear with the SUPREME logo and has duplicate copies with Mike Tyson's face on them LOL.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QkxTP-uL9O8

A girl proves she is 2nd in line of the top of the heap by buying $70,000 worth of Supreme for Louis Vuitton (streetwear).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKTeRX2YSVk


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#5 2017-09-11 20:36:36

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: 1982
Posts: 1043

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

To my mind, it's lazy thinking to say "Asians are tacky and buy LV for vanity reasons" or whatever, as there are many different versions of this all over the world with many different products (say, Turnbull and Asser shirts, for example). There are many kinds of "Asian," of course - it would be interesting to see how these bags and status symbols are seen in Japan, Vietnam, etc...

My significant other is Filipino-American, and her mother loves bags. For her it is not necessarily one-upmanship or flashiness as much as reveling in something she earned, moving from a farm in the Philippines to (eventually) a white-collar job in New York City. She wants a bag that says "I'm successful" because she had to have things that said the opposite for so long...

I personally find all of these brands and the consumption of them relatively harmless... The collectivist versus individualist debate is interesting, and anything about how different cultures perceive products or possessions is fascinating precisely because it has so many layers... Oversimplification is the enemy... as is complacency. Or cynicism.

Hermes has certainly done a good job keeping their cachet intact, though. Very interesting topic Shooman.


"RAHSAAN ROLAND KIRK! I COMMAND YOU TO GO TO SLEEP, AND DREAM!"
"Oh, dream... Oh! What am I gonna dream about? I done dreamt all I can dream about in life. I'm trying to wake up and live..."

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#6 2017-09-11 21:52:31

Goodyear welt
Ivyist At Large
Posts: 2695

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

Designer brands in China cost around 30% more than UK prices. Which is pretty weird.


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#7 2017-09-11 22:37:34

woofboxer
Devil's Ivy Advocate
From: Staines-upon-Thames, Middlesex
Posts: 5997

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

Goodyear welt wrote:

Designer brands in China cost around 30% more than UK prices. Which is pretty weird.

Indeed, as most of it is made in China to begin with!


'I'm not that keen on the Average Look .......ever'. 
John Simons

 

#8 2017-09-12 19:19:29

The_Shooman
A pretty face
From: AUSTRALIA
Posts: 12926

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

Berkeley_Breathes wrote:

There are many kinds of "Asian," of course - it would be interesting to see how these bags and status symbols are seen in Japan, Vietnam, etc...

In Japan brands are highly regarded too, and very expensive. Edward Greens were costing $3,000 several years ago according to some Japanese.


Berkeley_Breathes wrote:

My significant other is Filipino-American, and her mother loves bags. For her it is not necessarily one-upmanship or flashiness as much as reveling in something she earned, moving from a farm in the Philippines to (eventually) a white-collar job in New York City. She wants a bag that says "I'm successful" because she had to have things that said the opposite for so long...

That is a very interesting sharing. The fact that she wants to prove to the world she is successful by using a bag is such a fascinating mind set to think about. The more l study this topic the more l see that human beings often like to use status symbols to PROVE to the world they are SUCCESSFUL. What is success?....obviously to many it is financial success and perhaps some type of status.

Just as fascinating is the Mercedes situation. Like with Louis Vuitton, it is now available to the masses and almost like a Mall brand now. Every man and his dog seems to have one. Mercedes are now cheap and affordable to the average man, and it no longer means success, BUT folks keep on buying them because that 3 pointed star is status. There are various Mercedes that look like second rate versions of Mazdas and numerous second hand ones for sale on sites for 4K so now even poor people can show off a false status to the world and be a `somebody' in their mind. 

A Mercedes that looks like a second rate Toyota, but that is not the point. What really matters is that it has the 3 pointed star which equates to some humans as having status
https://s26.postimg.org/52zytevmx/Mercedes_toyata_second_rate.png

A Mercedes that a lower level office worker drives that looks like a Mazda, but the office worker wants status so he buys an affordable car with the 3 pointed star
https://s26.postimg.org/a2xf1d19l/Mercedes_mazda_1.jpg

A Mercedes for the very budget conscious. Even people with little money want status too, so they buy the 3 pointed star to show the world they are somebody! About 3K for this one
https://s26.postimg.org/sjrts6h7t/Mercedes_junk.png


The point is, the masses also want to be somebody and show off their perceived status,so they display brands and symbols so they can at least dream they are successful and somebody. This type of stuff fascinates me no end.


Berkeley_Breathes wrote:

Hermes has certainly done a good job keeping their cachet intact, though. Very interesting topic Shooman.

I find those young folk who spend obscene amounts on streetwear with big brand names on it extremely interesting too. They are young and not supposed to be at the peak of their careers yet, and they are not really supposed to have status because they are not really perceived as a somebody when they are so young, however they like to show a perceived status also. Kids buying Thom Brown to show they are a somebody and someone to be admired and to show their status. Look at all the young folk buying the SUPREME brand, it is obviously a status thing.

I was in a shoe shop and l was buying some nice shoes far nicer quality and cheaper than the kid next to me who was buying Gucci. He liked brands. I saw him about 15 minutes later and he had a baseball cap with the Gucci logo on it. He was wided eyed with logos, because to him that likely displayed to the world that he was a somebody. Even if one has $250 they can have status...all they need is a Gucci baseball cap. Heck, if you are really poor you can have enormous status for almost nothing by buying Hermes paper shopping bags and walking around the city like you are an elite and have the jealousy of countless wannabes:
https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R … p;_sacat=0

Last edited by The_Shooman (2017-09-12 19:30:58)


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#9 2017-09-12 19:41:37

The_Shooman
A pretty face
From: AUSTRALIA
Posts: 12926

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

woofboxer wrote:

Indeed, as most of it is made in China to begin with!

My shoemaker told me he visited a factory in China that makes 70% of the world's sunglasses.Most of those are the big name high end designer brands that have made in ltaly stamped on them. Many of the top designer shoes are also made in China. If you listen to that video l linked you will also find that Valentino italian suits are made in third world countries with massive markups and brands like Dunhill, Versace and Hugo Boss are made in third world sweatshops by children. Their training can be to watch a video on how to tailor.

Even some of the prestigious cars are now supposed to be made in places like Africa because they want to make them affordable to the masses, but apparently it can come with a downside of reliability according to reports that are supposed to be credible.


Buff's Bastards......exposing message board inanity and keeping false GODS accountable since 2006!

Cooked food should be made illegal - Dr Jubb (Jubsy)

 

#10 2017-09-12 20:19:28

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: 1982
Posts: 1043

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

Shooman, I don't know if you've read much Stanley Fish, but your comments about Mercedes reminded me of an essay he wrote called "The Unbearable Ugliness of Volvos"...

But the question remains, why Volvos? Why not Oldsmobiles, or Chryslers, or Mercury station wagons? The answer, I think, is that Volvos provided a solution to a new dilemma facing many academics--how to enjoy the benefits of increasing affluence while at the same time maintaining the proper attitude of disdain toward the goods affluence brings. In the context of this dilemma, the ugliness of the Volvo becomes its most attractive feature, for it allows those who own one to plead innocent to the charge of really wanting it. There must be another reason for the purchase, in this case a reason provided conveniently by the manufacturer in an advertising strategy that emphasizes safety. We don't buy these big expensive luxurious cars because we want to be comfortable or (God forbid) ostentatious; we buy them because we want to be safe. (I can only guess how many academics are now gobbling up overpriced Michelin tires reassured by a recent advertising campaign that they are purchasing family security rather than performance or glamour.) The ugliness of the automobile makes the cashing in of its negative value a straightforward and immediate transaction. Were the car not ugly, a Volvo owner might be in danger of hearing someone say, "My, what a stunning Volvo," to which he or she would have to respond, "Well, perhaps, but I really bought it because it is safe."

Later in the essay, Fish writes of the world of academia:

If I can put the matter in the form of a rule or rule of thumb: whenever you either want something or get something, manage it in such a way as to deny or disguise its material pleasures.

Hermes could be said to fit into this category - as could an old oxford cloth button down from Brooks Brothers, or any of Prince Charles's patched clothes (whose initial purchase as well as repairs are actually extremely expensive)...

As for logos, I have to agree with you... My dad has always refused to wear obvious logos because he hates the idea of being an ad, and he passed that down to me...


"RAHSAAN ROLAND KIRK! I COMMAND YOU TO GO TO SLEEP, AND DREAM!"
"Oh, dream... Oh! What am I gonna dream about? I done dreamt all I can dream about in life. I'm trying to wake up and live..."

Blog: https://rehearsingtheblues.blogspot.com/

 

#11 2017-09-12 22:15:20

The_Shooman
A pretty face
From: AUSTRALIA
Posts: 12926

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

Berkeley_Breathes wrote:

Shooman, I don't know if you've read much Stanley Fish, but your comments about Mercedes reminded me of an essay he wrote called "The Unbearable Ugliness of Volvos"...

But the question remains, why Volvos? Why not Oldsmobiles, or Chryslers, or Mercury station wagons? The answer, I think, is that Volvos provided a solution to a new dilemma facing many academics--how to enjoy the benefits of increasing affluence while at the same time maintaining the proper attitude of disdain toward the goods affluence brings. In the context of this dilemma, the ugliness of the Volvo becomes its most attractive feature, for it allows those who own one to plead innocent to the charge of really wanting it. There must be another reason for the purchase, in this case a reason provided conveniently by the manufacturer in an advertising strategy that emphasizes safety. We don't buy these big expensive luxurious cars because we want to be comfortable or (God forbid) ostentatious; we buy them because we want to be safe. (I can only guess how many academics are now gobbling up overpriced Michelin tires reassured by a recent advertising campaign that they are purchasing family security rather than performance or glamour.) The ugliness of the automobile makes the cashing in of its negative value a straightforward and immediate transaction. Were the car not ugly, a Volvo owner might be in danger of hearing someone say, "My, what a stunning Volvo," to which he or she would have to respond, "Well, perhaps, but I really bought it because it is safe."

.

Why of course, no-one buys Volvos and Mercedes because of the status because that would be so shallow, so they buy them solely for the safety *cough cough*.

Ladies don't buy the monogrammed Louis Vuitton bags to show the world they own a bag with lots of status because that would be shallow, they just buy it because they like the design of the monogram.

Kids don't buy clothes with big labels written on them because they want to broadcast to the world that they wear Gucci because that would be so shallow, they wear clothes because they like them and the Gucci writing just happens to be on it. smile

Impressing people you know and don't know is very important to many people. Buying into a perception is also very important because that can make a person happy for the moment. See...if you buy one of those Hermes' paper bags and carry it around you could walk tall and be king of the world that day IF you let you mind believe the illusion. If you can scrub floors for a living and you can still be a king and legend in your own mind. What is the difference between a king and a pauper?...nothing, both are kings in their own mind IF they have an ego which wants to think that. Materialism is just a tool that can be used to help become a king of your own make-believe world.


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Cooked food should be made illegal - Dr Jubb (Jubsy)

 

#12 2017-09-18 06:31:46

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14333

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

The_Shooman wrote:

woofboxer wrote:

Indeed, as most of it is made in China to begin with!

My shoemaker told me he visited a factory in China that makes 70% of the world's sunglasses.Most of those are the big name high end designer brands that have made in ltaly stamped on them. Many of the top designer shoes are also made in China. If you listen to that video l linked you will also find that Valentino italian suits are made in third world countries with massive markups and brands like Dunhill, Versace and Hugo Boss are made in third world sweatshops by children. Their training can be to watch a video on how to tailor.

Even some of the prestigious cars are now supposed to be made in places like Africa because they want to make them affordable to the masses, but apparently it can come with a downside of reliability according to reports that are supposed to be credible.

Not forgetting the big fat juicy "CE" mark on Chinese goods that is almost identical to the made in the EU CE mark.

The factory that makes the non-iron Brooks Brothers shirts apparently make them for all brands. You buy a non-iron shirt and it will have come from this factory.

Brands luxury, or otherwise, need to have status and this means they need to keep themselves a little bit rare. You can get away with off-shored production and cheaper prices, as that ultimately benefits the consumer, even rich ones. Ralph Lauren in the 1980's in the UK was considered a luxury brand as it was rare as hen's teeth and you needed to pay top dollar. I can remember when their shirts were well over GBP 100 and sports jackets were GBP 600+ that was the late 80's and early 1990s. Next thing you know they brought out the Chaps range and by the end of the decade it was something a scally would be wearing and everyone could afford it.

Same with Burberry and with BMW cars. Back in the day, a BMW was a high-powered executive's or successful business owner's car of choice if he was young enough (Mercedes were the older man's car of choice) now most of their cars are what a salesman has. The status has been eroded.

I read Dana Thomas's book. A good read and she poses the question on whether in this day and age of mass production and the same factories making stuff for everyone (that includes counterfits) whether there is any real luxury left.


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#13 2017-09-18 06:39:02

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: 1982
Posts: 1043

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

Luxury is moving into the area of custom-made and personalized, for that exact reason.


"RAHSAAN ROLAND KIRK! I COMMAND YOU TO GO TO SLEEP, AND DREAM!"
"Oh, dream... Oh! What am I gonna dream about? I done dreamt all I can dream about in life. I'm trying to wake up and live..."

Blog: https://rehearsingtheblues.blogspot.com/

 

#14 2017-09-19 03:58:35

woofboxer
Devil's Ivy Advocate
From: Staines-upon-Thames, Middlesex
Posts: 5997

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

Berkeley_Breathes wrote:

Shooman, I don't know if you've read much Stanley Fish, but your comments about Mercedes reminded me of an essay he wrote called "The Unbearable Ugliness of Volvos"...

But the question remains, why Volvos? Why not Oldsmobiles, or Chryslers, or Mercury station wagons? The answer, I think, is that Volvos provided a solution to a new dilemma facing many academics--how to enjoy the benefits of increasing affluence while at the same time maintaining the proper attitude of disdain toward the goods affluence brings. In the context of this dilemma, the ugliness of the Volvo becomes its most attractive feature, for it allows those who own one to plead innocent to the charge of really wanting it. There must be another reason for the purchase, in this case a reason provided conveniently by the manufacturer in an advertising strategy that emphasizes safety. We don't buy these big expensive luxurious cars because we want to be comfortable or (God forbid) ostentatious; we buy them because we want to be safe. (I can only guess how many academics are now gobbling up overpriced Michelin tires reassured by a recent advertising campaign that they are purchasing family security rather than performance or glamour.) The ugliness of the automobile makes the cashing in of its negative value a straightforward and immediate transaction. Were the car not ugly, a Volvo owner might be in danger of hearing someone say, "My, what a stunning Volvo," to which he or she would have to respond, "Well, perhaps, but I really bought it because it is safe."

Later in the essay, Fish writes of the world of academia:

If I can put the matter in the form of a rule or rule of thumb: whenever you either want something or get something, manage it in such a way as to deny or disguise its material pleasures.

Hermes could be said to fit into this category - as could an old oxford cloth button down from Brooks Brothers, or any of Prince Charles's patched clothes (whose initial purchase as well as repairs are actually extremely expensive)...

As for logos, I have to agree with you... My dad has always refused to wear obvious logos because he hates the idea of being an ad, and he passed that down to me...

I would certainly agree with the idea of erosion of the status of luxury brands. When I was a kid you stopped and stared as a Mercedes drove past, now they’re everywhere. In addition to luxury, their advertising used to promote the concept of their supposed reliability, remember the advert with the Mercedes mechanics sitting around playing cards in the workshop because there were no repairs for them to do? Of course they don’t mention that much now as Mercedes are one of the brands that is most prone to break down! Some may buy Volvos in order to make a statement about how they eschew luxury designer brands but I think the chief attraction is utility and longevity. You only have to see how many old 740 estates are trundling around the Jewish areas in North London.

I think the designer craze will eat itself, the more intelligent and informed consumer is already turning away from these brands. The hipster movement is perhaps evidence of that, although of course they have their own ‘under the radar’ status brands.


'I'm not that keen on the Average Look .......ever'. 
John Simons

 

#15 2017-09-20 17:49:19

The_Shooman
A pretty face
From: AUSTRALIA
Posts: 12926

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

4F Hepcat wrote:

Same with Burberry and with BMW cars. Back in the day, a BMW was a high-powered executive's or successful business owner's car of choice if he was young enough (Mercedes were the older man's car of choice) now most of their cars are what a salesman has. The status has been eroded.

Yes, like with Mercedes, most of the BMW's are now made off shore and the prices are made so the average person can afford them, but with that has come a lot of complaints about the quality. Many of the BMW's are now made in Africa, but apparently the companies like Mercedes and BMW can't compete with the Japanese makers within the lower middle price range so lots of unreliable cars are being made AND customer service is apparently poor because these once prestigious companies now are based on selling volume.

4F Hepcat wrote:

I read Dana Thomas's book. A good read and she poses the question on whether in this day and age of mass production and the same factories making stuff for everyone (that includes counterfits) whether there is any real luxury left.

Yes, l have been meaning to read her book for years, and a couple of weeks ago l eventually ordered it online. I really look forward to reading it.

Yes, what is luxury and what is not. Is John Lobb rtw luxury? I would argue not because it can be mass produced and is reliant on glue as a main part in it's construction. Canali suits are also mass produced in a factory, so not luxury in my eyes. Brioni rtw probably wouldn't be luxury either. Lots of Hermes goods like shoes are also be made in a factory and not to the highest standards, but not necessarily mass produced, so is it luxury?....imo it is not. To me luxury is rare and of the highest quality and often largely handmade, BUT it goes further than that because that qualification doesn't include all tailors because some are bad tailors v's some being great tailors, so imo luxury is impeccable and pretty much reaches the highest possible standards.



Berkeley_Breathes wrote:

Luxury is moving into the area of custom-made and personalized, for that exact reason.

It needs to because many of these brand names would be soul-less monster companies if they didn't offer customisation. Louis Vuitton would be a good example, but even now people complain about the poor customer service at LV's special order division. They may have a custom division, but it's not much good if you still run it with a mass market mentality. The youtube complaints are very telling about the attitudes of companies such as Mercedes and Louis Vuitton.


Buff's Bastards......exposing message board inanity and keeping false GODS accountable since 2006!

Cooked food should be made illegal - Dr Jubb (Jubsy)

 

#16 2017-09-20 18:39:13

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: 1982
Posts: 1043

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

An idea:

It seems to me that we're defining luxury as, "Company X makes a product that is very expensive and exclusive, and also unnecessary."

Then we're asking:

"What happens when Company X also offers things everybody can afford? Can the brand still be considered luxury if they offer less exclusive products?"

I would say yes. A luxury product is a luxury product is a luxury product. The most tricked out, high-end Mercedes is still luxury, even if they also offer entry-level versions that give peasants like ourselves the illusion of that luxury.

The expensive handbag is still luxury, even when owned by many, many people, because it is unnecessary and expensive. Even when owned by many, that expensive handbag is still "exclusive" because it is out of reach for so many.

I think we may be confusing a definition of luxury with a definition of demand by consumer. That is, a luxury handbag can still be luxury, but also be seen as undesirable because of how many people own it.

Hermes has managed their brand very well, so their bags, especially the Birkin, are both expensive and truly exclusive (or at least they have managed their image to continue to appear so). Alden shoes are a good example from our own world here on this forum. But I would argue that BMW is still a luxury brand.


"RAHSAAN ROLAND KIRK! I COMMAND YOU TO GO TO SLEEP, AND DREAM!"
"Oh, dream... Oh! What am I gonna dream about? I done dreamt all I can dream about in life. I'm trying to wake up and live..."

Blog: https://rehearsingtheblues.blogspot.com/

 

#17 2017-09-22 03:08:31

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14333

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

I would say by definition, a luxury item cannot be mass produced. A good case in point: Rolex watches. By any means of cost, quality, longevity and the craft of watchmaking these are expensive pieces and one would think the bulk of the range Submariner, etc are luxury items. Not so say watch afficionados and collectors: they are work horses that whilst of extremely high quality and precision are mass produced. The true luxury begins above the Rolex brand.

So then you get into over elaborate and complex movements, one-offs and the kind of watch you can pay 3 grand for a service on. They don't tell the time any better, they're not necessariy going to last longer than other less expensive watches that you can leave as an heirloom, but they have added pointlessness.

Luxury is something that does the job, but has many layers of added superfluous details be it status and prestige, or pointless gimmicks and costly extras.

With cars its somewhat different, a luxury high-end car, generally has significant improvements in performance and unless it's a sport's car, comfort.


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#18 2017-09-22 11:10:09

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: 1982
Posts: 1043

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

What about the Tesla conundrum, i.e. a luxury brand that actually wants to be accessible to all, but can't achieve it because of the things you say above, 4F ("a luxury item cannot be mass produced").


"RAHSAAN ROLAND KIRK! I COMMAND YOU TO GO TO SLEEP, AND DREAM!"
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#19 2017-09-22 11:47:50

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14333

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

By definition you cannot be accessible to all and be a luxury item, as much of that "luxury" comes from not being affordable or accessible to the many. There's a quality of exclusiveness here.

If we are saying that electric cars are luxury, well, the inflection point for electric cars is going to come by the mid 2020s and we'll all be driving electric cars with long ranges and short recharge times. That will cease to be luxury then, it will be mainstream. And that's coming for sure. Also with the benefits better crumpled zones and safety aspects with the reduced space of the electric engines.

Tesla's not really luxury, it's just ahead of the curve....for now.

I am not 100% convinced that the luxury model works well with cars. There's always a point with cars to get you from A to B.


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#20 2017-09-22 13:36:34

Berkeley_Breathes
Moderator
From: 1982
Posts: 1043

Re: wealthy Chinese shun Louis Vuitton and Gucci as too popular

I mean, the Model S is in the luxury sedan class, so technically it is marketed as luxury.


"RAHSAAN ROLAND KIRK! I COMMAND YOU TO GO TO SLEEP, AND DREAM!"
"Oh, dream... Oh! What am I gonna dream about? I done dreamt all I can dream about in life. I'm trying to wake up and live..."

Blog: https://rehearsingtheblues.blogspot.com/

 
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