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#1 2015-01-18 14:03:23

Bop
Member
Posts: 7661

Renaissance Men...

In the last year Ive got pretty into the work of Tallis, Byrd, Taverner (the elder)..and just generally a lot of music from that period. I thought it'd be quite inaccessible but I enjoy it as much as I do jazz hopefully some of you lot will like it too.

William Byrd - Pavan and Galliard a 6: http://youtu.be/xRQA_Z5USog

 

#2 2015-01-18 17:37:15

Worried Man
Member
From: Davebrubeckistan
Posts: 15951

Re: Renaissance Men...

^
I do like that.  Quite an evocative listening experience.


"We close our sto' at a reasonable hour because we figure anybody who would want one of our suits has got time to stroll over here in the daytime." - VP of George Muse Clothing, Atlanta, 1955

 

#3 2015-01-19 12:45:35

Bop
Member
Posts: 7661

Re: Renaissance Men...

Nice bit of Taverner Senior from the Tallis Scholars...who I had the pleasure of seeing at the Proms last year....They're like an 8th wonder of the world when you here them live...quite an experience


Taverner: Missa Gloria Tibi Trinitas: Sanctus & B…: http://youtu.be/m2NLYzsYSzc

 

#4 2015-01-20 11:58:41

Bop
Member
Posts: 7661

Re: Renaissance Men...

William Byrd - In Nomine No. 2 & No. 5: http://youtu.be/ckmr-cktbV8

 

#5 2015-01-20 12:25:56

4F Hepcat
THE Cat
Posts: 14333

Re: Renaissance Men...

Spin some phallic harpsicord for us Bop!


Vibe-Rations in Spectra-Sonic-Sound

 

#6 2015-01-20 14:42:37

Bop
Member
Posts: 7661

Re: Renaissance Men...

I'll certainly try

 

#7 2015-04-08 11:13:17

Bop
Member
Posts: 7661

Re: Renaissance Men...

Lovely stuff, one of my fav first 30 secs of music..tales off a bit but I could have that first bit on loop

Byrd comes good on this one early one by him

Miserere mihi, Domine: https://youtu.be/IGSc1-Mq_QE

Last edited by Bop (2015-04-08 11:14:45)

 

#8 2015-06-03 01:49:46

Bop
Member
Posts: 7661

Re: Renaissance Men...

Watch "Saltarello No. 3 (Anonymous)" on YouTube
https://youtu.be/DbAUs_MWBKM

Bit of early morning music to kickstart your day!

 

#9 2015-06-19 14:17:37

Joey
Member
From: Jazztown, USA
Posts: 660

Re: Renaissance Men...

Happy to hear someone besides me and the Early Music Department at my school appreciate this kind of stuff. Of course, I'm a fan of most types of classical music.

As a matter of fact, I'm recomposing/arranging a piece by Heinrich Isaac in a jazz big band format as part of a composition project I'm undertaking this summer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hpMIwuUg81E

 

#10 2015-06-19 14:44:25

Bop
Member
Posts: 7661

Re: Renaissance Men...

Its lovely stuff Joey...  Be interesting to hear what you do with it? Have you watched the Bernstein lectures BTW?

 

#11 2015-06-20 14:11:03

Joey
Member
From: Jazztown, USA
Posts: 660

Re: Renaissance Men...

I do not believe I have. What lectures are you referring to? I'd love to check them out.

When I finish the project (it's a six movement jazz suite, essentially) and get it recorded, I'll happily share the results with anyone who's interested here!

 

#12 2015-06-20 14:16:15

Bop
Member
Posts: 7661

Re: Renaissance Men...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Una … _Question_(lecture_series)

When he gets to the bit about chromatism and diatonicism and Bach..it all finally clicked into place for me

 

#13 2015-06-22 08:39:11

Joey
Member
From: Jazztown, USA
Posts: 660

Re: Renaissance Men...

Very interested in this lecture and the other info you've shared; I'll have a better chance to look into it when I get back home tonight.

This autumn, I'm applying for Phd programs in Music Theory, my primary interest being a bridge between so-called "classical" and "jazz" styles. The performance practice is quite different, especially in later classical music where strict interpretation of written music is the norm, but the theoretical and compositional techniques are more related than many realize. At least, that's what I intend to argue. I have a few copies somewhere of Bach pieces whose melodies would sound at home in a Webern composition, for example. Not to mention Bach's style is essentially bebop.

It's a deep well but I think the main disconnect between Jazz and European Classical music styles is merely of terminology. For example, my jazz composition professor wrote a piece with a three part chorale (trombone, F horn, and flügelhorn I think) and it was constructed of stacked fourths interspersed with 016 trichords (the so-called "Viennese" trichords). Anyway, this chorale, out of context, looked like an exercise on Schoenberg. But when I asked the professor about it, he told me that in the 80s, when he wrote the piece, he hadn't even heard of Viennese trichords (or at least, hadn't studied them). He was grouping sets of three notes based on subsets of the harmonies that appear later in the piece. Essentially, he produced a chorale exactly like one you'd find in post-tonal classical music, but he came about it via a completely different compositional method.

I was a little preoccupied while typing this, so hopefully it makes some sense. My point is jazz composers (intentionally or unintentionally) use similar harmonic and melodic techniques as various European "classical" music composers, from Bach to Bartók. ... It'll read better when I put it in a thesis.

Also, my apologies for highjacking this thread with young people's music. Here's some Josquin to make up for it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfVnqU8hyxU

Last edited by Joey (2015-06-22 08:39:42)

 

#14 2015-06-22 10:31:47

Bop
Member
Posts: 7661

Re: Renaissance Men...

Bach cadences seem to underpin the Protestant church music that technically became Jazz and his fusion of chromaticism and diatonic music meant in many ways it really shared a hell of a lot with bebop..I try and produce the same experience in my artwork with the colors..

https://instagram.com/p/4OVqDmwmKQ/

Get the tonic up slap the perfect 4th or 5th up then hang the other tensions around it.

Do you know much about Indian music theory Joey?  Similar principles for the sa and pa intervals, which limits harmony but increase melodic possibilities ten fold

Last edited by Bop (2015-06-22 10:36:45)

 

#15 2015-06-26 09:05:17

Joey
Member
From: Jazztown, USA
Posts: 660

Re: Renaissance Men...

Bop wrote:

Bach cadences seem to underpin the Protestant church music that technically became Jazz and his fusion of chromaticism and diatonic music meant in many ways it really shared a hell of a lot with bebop..I try and produce the same experience in my artwork with the colors..

https://instagram.com/p/4OVqDmwmKQ/

Get the tonic up slap the perfect 4th or 5th up then hang the other tensions around it.

Do you know much about Indian music theory Joey?  Similar principles for the sa and pa intervals, which limits harmony but increase melodic possibilities ten fold

I'm a big fan of unifying all forms and genres of artwork, man. Way back when I was a freshman (first year of college), I took a theory class about the evolution of renaissance music into baroque and ultimately the classical period (ending with the first Viennese school). The professor in that class was great; With every new piece or era, he'd show us a contemporary piece of visual art or architecture to contextualize the aesthetic of the period.

I love the colors in your artwork, man. I have trouble understanding visual art on the same level as music, but I'm always trying.

I'm not deeply familiar with Indian music theory, only on a very colloquial basis. Though I have studied the concept of Swara: I took an ethnomusicology class last year that touched on Indian music theory, but it was a "big picture" kind of class- we essentially got short introductions to the music-cultures of a dozen different regions over the course of a few weeks. I remember being most transfixed by the music of India and some middle eastern countries, where improvisation is an important part of classical music. Indonesian gamelan music was also interesting, as it was the most removed from western music of all the regions I studied.

The way you describe sa and pa reminds me of the techniques used in contrapuntal 16th century music. For example, in the 16th century, a Perfect 4th was considered dissonant. There were loads of rules as well regarding melody writing. It was a headache to be so constrained, but if you master the techniques, the melodic possibilities are really endless. I try to apply the same sort of minimalist aesthetic to my big band writing.

 

#16 2015-06-26 09:35:17

Bop
Member
Posts: 7661

Re: Renaissance Men...

Well basically harmony wise the relationship for the perfect intervals is so strong..it helps the ear maintain a point of reference so that you can really go to town on chromaticism... But there is a good series of bids on bebop theory by a guy on you tube that explains why certain chromatic notes are uses in bebop and its very interesting... I'll find the links...all my art work is based on music theor when it comes to colors and the compositions are based on rhythms also.. Its strange they come out so much like Rothko and other artists who to my knowledge weren't doing that

 

#17 2015-06-30 11:37:52

Bop
Member
Posts: 7661

Re: Renaissance Men...

This is a good read Joey explaining a lot about harmony etc..and interestingly for me from a color point of view the diagrams they move around in order to make the chords...are the standard relationships we use for color theory.. I before reading this adopted these musical relationships over the color wheel to get these new intervals in terms of color theory..but this short essay is all based on music.
http://www.integermusic.com/?p=79

Last edited by Bop (2015-06-30 11:38:17)

 

#18 2016-03-02 14:15:36

Bop
Member
Posts: 7661

Re: Renaissance Men...

Like a pure shot of serotonin...

Lovely stuff...

https://youtu.be/e6tJWY2Vaz4

 

#19 2017-11-10 12:58:36

Babbling Brooks
Member
Posts: 265

Re: Renaissance Men...

Run yourself a deep bath and slap this on....beautiful piece of music


https://youtu.be/J6McIK8ULrk

 

#20 2017-12-06 03:59:27

Babbling Brooks
Member
Posts: 265

Re: Renaissance Men...

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/98/f9/b0/98f9b094030e2fbd82286965ee631750.jpg

 

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